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The answer is 9. root 10. up 11 Despite 12 capable 13 this 14 in 15 such

Could anyone give me a reason why 'in' fits blank 14?

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in as much as is an idiom meaning because.

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I've never seen it written that way in the U.S.

So I thought it was always "inasmuch as".

Go figure.

CJ

CalifJimSo I thought it was always "inasmuch as".

me too.

Nhật Bình
CalifJimSo I thought it was always "inasmuch as".

me too.

It is.

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in as much as is an acceptable alternative [link ] and in is the only option available for the OP.

Rover_KE

in as much as is an acceptable alternative [link ] and in is the only option available for the OP.

I don't see what you mean. That a small minority have made that mistake since 1800 does not make it an acceptable alternative. The OED has this for the etylomogy:

"Etymology: originally three words in as much (in northern Middle English in als mikel), subsequently sometimes written as two words, in asmuch, and now (especially since 17th cent.) as one."

"In" is indeed the answer the test was looking for, but it is a flawed question.

'in so far as' is still used by more than a small minority—often in respectable publications. [link ]

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