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I learnt "in XX days" means something would happen after XX days from the certain day.

I found a sentence, "In 90 days we will launch the new social network site."

This sentence was written by someone in California on June 2, 2009.

I calculated; June 2 + 90 days = August 31.

I wondered whether this sentence has a different meaning from "Within 90 days...."

Does he/she intend to say they will launch it exactly on August 31, and never on August 30 or earlier?

If so, why didn't he/she write the exact date?

Thank you!
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Context, context ..... so much depends on it.

However, in normal AmEng usage, "in 90 days" is usually equal to saying "in about 90 days", and is seldom meant to convey the level of precision implied by your August 31 date.

Usually, when an exact time frame is intended, the specific date will be given since "in 90 days" is a relative term and may give the wrong impression if heard on other than the correct day.

Of course, when talking with Government people, that may really mean "the soonest will be in 90 days from now, but don't bet on it".

And Military people probably mean August 31 or else !!
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GirlInRedShoesI learnt "in XX days" means something would happen after XX days

"In 90 days we will launch the new social network site."

I wondered whether this sentence has a different meaning from "Within 90 days...." I take "in XX days" to mean as close as possible to XX days, absent context to the contrary. I would never take it as meaning after XX days, absent context. If that's what is meant, there are much better ways to say it.
"In 90 days" and "within 90 days" most assuredly have different meanings. "Within 90 days means "90 days on the outside." It could happen at any time within the stated period.

Best wishes, - A.Emotion: smile

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Hi, dumbswede

Thank you for a quick answer!

Your answer is very helpful.

Now I understand it clearly!

I am not working with Military people but with some Japanese companies.

If I translate "in 90 days" word for word into Japanese, many of them will believe it means "August 31"... Actually, in the past case like this, my former Japanese boss forced me to annouce to all employees that the launch date was confirmed, and started to prepare inauguration events! This is not a joke, a real story.

So, I will translate this phrase as "in about 90 days".

Maybe some will complain about my "incorrect" translation, but I don't like them to make another fuss about the "confirmed launch date".

Thank you!
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Thank you, avangi.

Your English is a little bit difficult for me... ^^;

But the explanation about the difference between "in 90 days" and "within 90 days" are very easy to understand even for me.

Thank you!
GirlInRedShoes Your English is a little bit difficult for me
Thanks for the tip! I'll try to mend my ways!Emotion: geeked
Avangi I take "in XX days" to mean as close as possible to XX days, absent context to the contrary. I would never take it as meaning after XX days, absent context. If that's what is meant, there are much better ways to say it.

Hi, Avangi

Notwithstanding my earnest efforts, I can't wrap my head around your "absent context to the contrary" ))

Did you mean "unless the context that is absent points to the contrary" ?

Thanks !
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Am I getting double-teamed here? Emotion: big smile
I suppose it does sound a bit legalistic.
You have the idea. I use it to mean something like, "At this point in time, it appears that there is no context available pointing to the contrary. (It is absent, or non-existent.) As long as this condition obtains (or is in effect), I shall stand by my statement."
For some reason I associate it in my mind with the great old Paul Newman flick, "The Absence Of Malice" with Sally Fields. The line was spoken by Wilfred Brimley, as District Attorney. The state had to show malice, which it could not.
Now that you press me on it, I'm not having much luck defending it. It's an adjective, but I'm using it more like a preposition.
Absent proof, I'm going to have to let him go.
Without proof, I'm going to have to let him go.

Perhaps someone can come to my rescue, or persuade me to quit using the expression. Emotion: thinking

Edit. I suppose you could translate it, "Proof being absent, I'm going to have to let him go." Now it's an adjective!
(Context to the contrary being absent, etc.)