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1. Father was riding in a train. (Reading Plus,Level One, page 55)

2. He was going for his first ride in an airplane. Bill and his father got into the airplane. (Reading Plus, Level One, page 62)

Why not say on a train, on an airplane?
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Hi,

1. Father was riding in a train. (Reading Plus,Level One, page 55)

2. He was going for his first ride in an airplane. Bill and his father got into the airplane. (Reading Plus, Level One, page 62)

Why not say on a train, on an airplane?

1. Father was riding in a train. Both 'in' and 'on' sound OK.

2. He was going for his first ride in <<< 'on' does not sound idiomatic an airplane. Bill and his father got into <<< into/in are not idiomatic, you need to say 'on' the airplane.

Best wishes, Clive
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CliveWhy not say on a train, on an airplane?

1. Father was riding in a train. Both 'in' and 'on' sound OK.

2. He was going for his first ride in <<< 'on' does not sound idiomatic an airplane. Bill and his father got into <<< into/in are not idiomatic, you need to say 'on' the airplane.

Best wishes, Clive

I agree with Mr. Clive's explanation.
'Ride in a train' is a rather childish expression, probably suitable for this kind of elementary reading book. 'On' is the standard preposition for trains.

'In an airplane' is used for private/light aircraft, as opposed to large, commercial airliners.

http://www.englishclub.com/esl-forums/viewtopic.php?p=329994#329994