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(1)The river is in the same distance from my house to the sea.
(2)The river is at the same distance from my house to the sea.


Do they both make sense? If they do, do they have the same meaning or not? If the meanings are different, what is the difference?
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Comments  
IMO:
2)The river is at the same distance from my house and from the sea.
Taka, it's not clear what you mean. Is the distance from the house to the river the same as from the house to the sea? Marius's sentence says that the river to your house is the same as the river to the sea. But I'm not sure that's what you mean. Either way, you don't need the "at" at all. You may be better of simply saying "as far as" rather than distance.

It is as far from my house to the river as to the sea.
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Grammar GeekTaka, it's not clear what you mean. Is the distance from the house to the river the same as from the house to the sea?
Sorry about the confusion, but right, it's:

(the sea)---X km---(the house)---X km---(the river)

Your expression, 'The distance from the house to the river is the same as from the house to the sea' or 'It is as far from my house to the river as to the sea', is certainly fine. But I'm wondering if 'The river is in the same distance' and 'The river is at the same distance' are also fine, grammatically and semantically.
My first choice would be no preposition at all: The river is the distance.
Grammar GeekMy first choice would be no preposition at all: The river is the distance.
OK. Then, what if you were supposed to use 'There is ...' construction, like 'There is a river...'? 'There is a river in the same distance' or 'There is a river at the same distance'? Or are they both acceptable?
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Jumping in--

The river is the same distance from my house as the sea is.

If, for reasons of wanting to 'pinpoint' the location, at does it a lot better than in.

The river is at the same distance from my house as the sea is.

EDIT: Did not see you last post, Taka.
DavkettIf, for reasons of wanting to 'pinpoint' the location, at does it a lot better than in.

The river is at the same distance from my house as the sea is.
Right. But what if the distance is not exactly the same. That is:

[(The sea)---10 km--(The house)----9.5-9.6 km--(The river)--]
If I didn't want to be so exact about the distance, then I'd say--

The river is within the same distance (10 km) from the house as the sea is.

Of course, that could mean that the sea is 10 km away and the river is 1 km away.

Are you looking for 'nearly the same distance' away?

In just doesn't work, for me.
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