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Dear friends,

Would you please tell me when should I use "IN the beginning" or "AT the beginning" ?

Thank you in advance,

Hela
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Hi,

Much dependson the context, and sometimes you can use either. However, here are a couple of comments.

"IN the beginning" Treats the beginning as a period of time, or something having length. 'In' means at some point(s) during that.

"AT the beginning" 'At' refers to the first point of beginning.

Consider this.

The Bible says In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The idea is that it took him a little time to do that. On the other hand, at the beginning there was nothing.

In The Sound Of Music, Julie Andrews sang Let's start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. When you read you begin with ABC, When you sing you begin with do-re-mi.

Best wishes, Clive
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Hey Clive, if you're going to tease me about that H in Gettysburg, I can tease you about Mary Martin singing that line on Broadway years before Julie Andrews sang it in the movie Emotion: stick out tongue
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Comments  
The opposite of 'at the beginning' is 'at the end'.
I go to the gym and train 3 times a week.

I train on the bicycle and on the threadmill at the beginning of my training. I do some stretching of muscles at the end of training.
[ Players shake hand at the end of football/ice hockey match.]

We could use 'in the end' to say the final phase or final part of something.

I sold my car recently. At first, there were a lof of offers. It took some time to made the decision. In the end I sold it to a person in my neighbourhood.

In the end means finally.

The opposite of 'in the end' is 'at first'.

[ I hope Clive and the other native speakers will toe the line with me; I am not a native speaker of English.]
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