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"Most of it was in blank, but the

solitary compositor who did the thing had amused himself by making a

grotesque scheme of advertisement stereo on the back page."

I don't think it simply means "blank" here, because the contrary is related to the amusement or feeling of the compositor (typesetter).

I know "in blank" may also mean "without limitation or restriction", but I still don't believe that would work in this context as then the contrary "but" would need not follow as a "grotesque scheme of advertisement" is, in fact, without restriction in regards to what is acceptable to print.
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Hi,

I have no idea what all this means. What is the context?

What is 'a grotesque scheme of advertisement stereo'?

Clive
Anonymous"Most of it was in blank, but the
solitary compositor who did the thing had amused himself
Do you have any information at all about what "the thing" is? Could "blank verse" possibly be involved?

In what context are you familiar with "blank" as meaning "unrestricted"? Newspaper, magazine?
Is advertising it's primary purpose?
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Here is the sentence in context:

"It was the placard of the first

newspaper to resume publication--the Daily Mail. I bought a copy for a

blackened shilling I found in my pocket. Most of it was in blank, but the

solitary compositor who did the thing had amused himself by making a

grotesque scheme of advertisement stereo on the back page. The matter he

printed was emotional; the news organisation had not as yet found its way

back."

"grotesque scheme of advertisement stereo on the back page" means an odd or unnatural set or scheme (scheme used to imply some underhanded intent behind the advertising I believe ) of advertisements also copied on the back page

"

Hi,

This is all very obscure.

When was it written? By whom? As part of what? eg a book?

Clive
War of the Worlds - H.G. Wells, 1898, British
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Hi,

I really don't know what exactly it means. It's a good example of how English can change over the course of more than a century.

Clive