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A)

1. I didn't want to say anything about the accident in case she shouldn't be informed that her son was involved

2. I didn't want to say anything about the accident in case she hadn't been informed that her son was informed

3. I didn't want to say anything about the accident in case she wasn't informed that her son was involved

4. I didn't want to say anything about the accident in case she might not have been informed that her son was involved

B)

1. He got rid of his cell phone in case he could be traced

2. He got rid of his cell phone in case he should be traced

3. He got rid of his cell phone in case he was traced

4. He got rid of his cell phone in case he could have been traced

Hello,

What are the differences among the given choices respectively. What model or forms follow "in case" grammatically and which of these are the commonest usage in modern English grammar?
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Comments  
>1. He got rid of his cell phone in case he could be traced

I don't think "in case" works too well here, even though it's used by many. I'd suggest:

He got rid of his cell phone so that he couldn't/can't be traced.
He got rid of his cell phone so that he may not / might not be traced.
He got rid of his cell phone so that he wouldn't be traced.
He got rid of his cell phone such that he wouldn't be traced.
He got rid of his cell phone (in order) to avoid being traced.
He got rid of his cell phone to avoid tracing.
Marius Hancu>1. He got rid of his cell phone in case he could be traced

I don't think "in case" works too well here, even though it's used by many. I'd suggest:

He got rid of his cell phone so that he couldn't/can't be traced.
He got rid of his cell phone so that he may not / might not be traced.
He got rid of his cell phone so that he wouldn't be traced.
He got rid of his cell phone such that he wouldn't be traced.
He got rid of his cell phone (in order) to avoid being traced.
He got rid of his cell phone to avoid tracing.


Thank you very much for your quick reply Marius. One more question if you don't mind.

Don't forget to take your umbrella in case it.......................rain.

a) could

b) should

Which one best fits in the gap? Why?

Thanks again Marius
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As a matter of fact, I found I was wrong (I only thought of the "if" meaning): Emotion: sad

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in case

Function: conjunction

Date: 14th century

1 : IF<in case we are surprised, keep by me -- Washington Irving>
2 : as a precaution against the event that <carries a gun in case he is attacked>

Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary
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Thus, you can use "in case" with meaning 2 here in those sentences.
KilimanjaroOne more question if you don't mind.
Don't forget to take your umbrella in case it.......................rain.

a) could

b) should

Which one best fits in the gap? Why?
Should.

399-0 at Google, for
"in case it should rain"
vs.
"in case it could rain"
Marius Hancu
KilimanjaroOne more question if you don't mind.

Don't forget to take your umbrella in case it.......................rain.

a) could

b) should

Which one best fits in the gap? Why?

Should.

399-0 at Google, for
"in case it should rain"
vs.
"in case it could rain"

So you say in this example, we can't use "could" but "should". But "could" is possible for the sentences in the examples in my first message. Am I wrong?
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Hi guys,
"in case it should" and "in case it could" don't make sense to me. Isn't it "in case it rains"? (simple present)
Yes, "could" can be used for your first series of examples.
Marius HancuYes, "could" can be used for your first series of examples.
Then why NOT in this example Marius?

Don't forget to take your umbrella in case it.......................rain.

a) could

b) should
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