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1. The food would have to be amazingly delicious, so as to never be forgotten by his friends.

2. The food would have to be amazingly delicious so as to never be forgotten by his friends.

If the comma before "so" is left out from #1, is #1's meaning different from #2?

I'd say without a comma, the first sentence makes no sense.

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It is a hair-splitting question. To me, (2) conveys a stronger suggestion that being amazingly delicious is the only way to ensure that it would not be forgotten.

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GPY

It is a hair-splitting question. To me, (2) conveys a stronger suggestion that being amazingly delicious is the only way to ensure that it would not be forgotten.

To you, the so-as-to part of (1) does seem to imply result, and the so-as-to part of (2) does seem to imply purpose?

fire1To you, the so-as-to part of (1) does seem to imply result, and the so-as-to part of (2) does seem to imply purpose?

This may be a way of looking at it, though I think the question of how far (1) expresses purpose is really quite ambiguous. The whole content of the sentence makes us imagine that someone will be cooking delicious food in order that the food will not be forgotten, and this understanding tends to override punctuation nitpicks, I would say.

I see the matter differently. The sense is off. It seems to be saying that his friends normally quickly forget food, and therefore it would have to be exceptionally tasty to overcome this memory deficit they suffer from. I suspect you were going for something more like "The food would have to be amazingly delicious, such that it would never be forgotten by his friends." That comma is necessary because the "such that" clause is independent.

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anonymous"The food would have to be amazingly delicious, such that it would never be forgotten by his friends.

Can I say this as "The food would have to be amazingly delicious, such as to never be forgotten by his friends" ?

fire1Can I say this as "The food would have to be amazingly delicious, such as to never be forgotten by his friends" ?

No, it's unidiomatic. "Such as" does not mean that.