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Please read the diary, then tell me: In the context, "since I was here" or "since I have been here"?

Thursday 15, June, 1944

Dear kitty,

I wonder if it’s because I haven’t been able to be outdoors for so long that I’ve grown so crazy about everything to do with nature. I can well remember that there was a time when a deep blue sky, the song of the birds, moonlight and flowers could never have kept me spellbound. That’s changed since I was here.

…For example, when it was so warm, I stayed awake on purpose until half past eleven one evening in order to have a good look at the moon for once by myself. But as the moon gave far too much light, I didn’t dare open a window. Another time some months ago, I happened to be upstairs one evening when the window was open. I didn’t go downstairs until the window had to be shut. The dark, rainy evening, the wind, the thundering clouds held me entirely in their power; it was the first time in a year and a half that I’d seen the night face to face…

…Sadly…I am only able to look at nature through dirty curtains hanging before very dusty windows. It’s no pleasure looking through these any longer because nature is one thing that really must be experienced.

Yours,

Anne
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Comments  
...since I have been here.
...since I came here.
What do you mean? Do you mean both are ok?
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Both of my suggestions are OK.
Mister MicawberBoth of my suggestions are OK.
Is there any difference in meaning?

My teacher says: the author is now still here, so we shouldn't use the past tense. She says we had better use the present perfect in this case.

Is she right?
MrM is right of course.

The problem here is, I think, that native speakers sometimes use an incorrect tense after "since". You may sometimes hear them say

It's been a while since I've seen you.

Obviously the sentence should read

It's been a while since I (last) saw you.

But

That's changed since I've been here or even "that's changed since I've lived here"

for instance there's a difference between

It's been a while since I lived here. (= I no longer live here)

and

It's been a while since I've lived here. (I still live here)

That's changed since I was here. (this works only if you no longer live there, which obiously isn't the case in your essay)
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IvanhrMrM is right of course. The problem here is, I think, that native speakers sometimes use an incorrect tense after "since". You may sometimes hear them say It's been a while since I've seen you.Obviously the sentence should read It's been a while since I (last) saw you. ButThat's changed since I've been here or even "that's changed since I've lived here" for instance there's a difference between It's been a while since I lived here. (= I no longer live here)andIt's been a while since I've lived here. (I still live here) That's changed since I was here. (this works only if you no longer live there, which obiously isn't the case in your essay)

Are you sure the author used the wrong tense?

It's wrong if she still lives there.
IvanhrIt's wrong if she still lives there.

After we have read the diary, can't we draw the conclusion that the author still lives there? Why do you use "if"?
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