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Could you tell me if these are possible?

Could you tell whether he is generous in/by comparison with her?
Could you tell whether he is generous in/by contrast with her?
Could you tell whether he is generous in relation to you?
Could you tell whether he is generous compared to her?

Her 2nd album is good, but in/by contrast with her first, (it) isn't great.
Her 2nd album is good, but in/by comparison with her first, (it) isn't great.
Her 2nd album is good, but in relation to her first, (it) isn't great.

Could you tell me what you think of this grammatically?

- I could eat a lot and (30 minutes later) it's as if I hadn't eaten./I haven't eaten/it's like I never ate.

Thank you
Comments  
alc24Could you tell me what you think of this grammatically?
Hi,
I am very curious how you come up with the sentences that you have posted. I have been reading your questions, which by the way usually are evolving phrases and whether or not you can say it in a certain patterns, rarely about grammaticality. For that, I would offer a couple of comments.

Her second album is good, but in/by contrast with her first, it isn't great. -ok

Her second album is good, but in/by comparison with her first, it isn't great. ok

Her second album is good, but in relation to her first, it isn't great. I won't use "in relation" in this sentence.
I am curious to know if you are aware of the subtlety between "contrast" vs. "compare"; although both seemed to work for your sentences. I recommend that you "Google" the definition and usage. "in relation" typically infers "tie" between two observations. i.e.

A double epidemic: crystal methamphetamine drug use in relation to HIV transmission
Declining Drug Use in Relation to Increased Drug Education: A Trend Study 1979-1991.
Hello Anon.

Thank you for the help, Is the first batch just like the second? and the last sentence how would you say it please?

I read a lot so I come across sentences and then I either come up with a sentence that has to do with the one I've read or I watch a film in french and try to translate it, thinking to myself how you'd say it in english. I'm french and I used to live in america so my brain maybe naturally tries to translate the sentence for me.

Where are you from? Where do you live?

I have a nice day.

bye
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
To be honest, I didn't touch the first "batch" because they sounded a bit awkward and I didn't want to get too analytical. If you read a lot, I take it that you have learned a lot about sentence patterns and structures. I would suggest that you follow what you extract from your reading. You tend to have too many nouns and phrases in your sentences which may or may not be suitable to the contexts. That's what makes them awkward and hard to work with.

I had stayed in Paris for 2 days about 10 years ago while I was touring Europe. I loved this romantic and beautuful city but I found it very difficult for those who couldn't understand French to get around, and I hadn't got a word of French on me at the time, and I still don't. I'd like to learn French by I find my tongue unable to roll with it. So learning French will not be my goal in the foreseeable future .
I have made San Francisco my home for the last 30 years. As a young immigrant, I had struggled with English for a few years, and I wasn't interested in learning it. As a reult, I hated my new life in America. But as I grew older, I realized that if I didn't master the language, I would not be able to acclimate to my surroundings, much less becoming successful. So I made it my ultimate mission to master the language. The rest is a long story.