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Like Mike Lyle, I'll be interested to read the Guardian's postbag on Monday. Thousands of Americans live in London and ... do anywhere else. It does seem, though, that Ms Gould has been extremely unfortunate in experiencing so much of both.

I was in England this summer; my daughter spent the summer working in France and Switzerland, and also spent a couple of weeks in London. We both are usually taken for Americans by people who don't know us. I can testify that neither of us have had an experience even remotely similar to what Ms Gould describes.
I read the article when it was first published (I forget when, but earlier in the week), and wondered whether it was the result, not of Anti-American feeling, but of Ms Gould being personally obnoxious. Never having met the lady, I don't feel able to make a judgement.
Fran
(snip discussion of Carol Gould, found)

and
a web-based magazine called "Jewish Comment"

She's the Editor. Here's an opinion piece by her from last December http://www.jewishcomment.com/cgibin/news.cgi?id=11&command=shownews&newsid=614 She's also making reference there to ... Ambassador to Great Britain, was foot-pounded, heckled and screamed at by a vicious BBC studio audience two days after 9/11."

I was taken aback by that "foot-pounded," as it suggested being physically mauled and kicked. Yet I had already looked up the description of the show and knew there was no physical tussle. I don't find "foot-pound" being used as any sort of metaphorical verb.

Can someone explain it? Is it perhaps the stomping of feet by British audiences as a sign of disapproval, like booing?
(Whistling as a European sign of disapproval also took some time for me to get used to when Americans disapprove of something, they don't whistle! And I've heard that there is a sort of slow hand-clap that is derisive but I've never encountered it myself.)
I suppose I should add my report to the others, that I have made short visits to the UK several times since 9/11 with no detection of anti-American hostility. And central London being what it is these days, I probably had more interactions with citizens of Middle-Eastern and Asian descent than Anglo-Saxon. But it sounds like Carol Gould was a long-term resident, not a visitor, and that's quite different.

Best Donna Richoux
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Donna Richoux typed thus:
(snip discussion of Carol Gould, found) and

She's the Editor. Here's an opinion piece by her from ... by a vicious BBC studio audience two days after 9/11."

I was taken aback by that "foot-pounded," as it suggested being physically mauled and kicked. Yet I had already looked ... someone explain it? Is it perhaps the stomping of feet by British audiences as a sign of disapproval, like booing?

It's not in common usage, but yes, I took it to mean that the audience stamped their feet as a sign of disapproval.
(Whistling as a European sign of disapproval also took some time for me to get used to when Americans ... And I've heard that there is a sort of slow hand-clap that is derisive but I've never encountered it myself.)

The slow hand clap. Very effective, but it only works if there is a large number of people doing it. They all clap together with a frequency of about 1 clap per second. The Womens Institute did it to the Tonyblair when he made a political speech at their conference instead of discussing damson jam: http://tinyurl.com/4mpzd

"I was on the tier and I could see people at the front starting a slow hand clap and one or two shouted at him and I thought they were very bad mannered.
Doris Tiffin, president of Hoddlesden WI, said she had only ever known one speaker who had been heckled when he had praised genetically modified foods.
"He was heckled, but I have never known anyone to be slow- handclapped before.
I suppose I should add my report to the others, that I have made short visits to the UK several ... descent than Anglo-Saxon. But it sounds like Carol Gould was a long-term resident, not a visitor, and that's quite different.

Serves her right for living in London, which is a centre of rudeness. I was there the other day and was relived to board the northward bound Pendolino at Euston, even though there was no food of any sort on board; I was travelling first class so should have been given a free meal. They managed to get some airline style packets of spicy nibbles at Tamworth - I felt sorry for those going all the way to Glasgow. Gould should come and live in the provinces where there are plenty of foreigners quietly getting on without any harassment.

David
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Donna Richoux typed thus:

I suppose I should add my report to the others, ... a long-term resident, not a visitor, and that's quite different.

Serves her right for living in London, which is a centre of rudeness. I was there the other day and ... Gould should come and live in the provinces where there are plenty of foreigners quietly getting on without any harassment.

There may be a germ of truth in your generalisation: no-one has ever been rude to me in Manchester, although Sheffield can be an unkind place. However, I think that Oxford contains some of the worst mannered people in the world. Examples from the past three days: the arrogant couple who barged past a dozen people to reach their theatre seats after the play and started and then did the same thing after the interval; the surly and unapologetic bus driver who, ignoring the fact that the bell had been rung, sailed past the request stop at which my mother wanted to get off; and the person at an up-market restaurant who answered my telephone request to book a table with "No booking on Fridays" and then slammed down the phone.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Donna Richoux typed thus: Serves her right for living in ... are plenty of foreigners quietly getting on without any harassment.

There may be a germ of truth in your generalisation: no-one has ever been rude to me in Manchester, although ... who answered my telephone request to book a table with "No booking on Fridays" and then slammed down the phone.[/nq]It's everywhere, Laura. You'd notice it even more were you disabled. IMO, it's because of two generations of "Me, me" selfishness. A lot of people have grown up without being taught any manners at all, either because their parents grew up in the same way, or because their parents couldn't care less what they do. Others, particularly what I call "the green welly crowd" have the attitude "out of my way, plebs". There is also the problem that a lot of people are in monotonous, low-paid jobs which they do not enjoy.

A generation or two ago they would have been in factories, and would not have had much contact with the public. Now, the factories have closed, and they're in local government offices, shops, supermarkets and other places where they can vent spleen on all who come into contact with them. A complaint gets you to a manager who often is of the same frame of mind. Nobody is fired or reprimanded for incompetence or rudeness any more.

They represent perhaps only a minority of the population, but they are present in sufficient numbers to make it difficult to avoid them.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
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An interesting article about Rightpondia in today's Guardian: http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,1328663,00.html Comment ... my safety Carol Gould Saturday October 16, 2004 The Guardian

Disturbing; but it was news to me. We must check the inevitable responses in Monday's edition to see if they confirm or deny.

I'm afraid that whilst the specifics of the reported case are very shocking, the basic fact of this current antoi-Americanism in the UK is familar to anyone who comes into contact with political expression - and I mean left-wing political expression in particular.
Who of those who witnessed it could ever forget the howling mob of the usual loony-left uspects invited as an alleged "representative" audience at the BBC "Question Time" television programme a few days after 11th September 2001?
There may be a germ of truth in your generalisation: ... "No booking on Fridays" and then slammed down the phone.

It's everywhere, Laura. You'd notice it even more were you disabled. IMO, it's because of two generations of "Me, me" ... only a minority of the population, but they are present in sufficient numbers to make it difficult to avoid them.

SO true.
Neno
http://free-st.htnet.hr/na/
Laura F Spira typed thus:
Donna Richoux typed thus: Serves her right for living in ... are plenty of foreigners quietly getting on without any harassment.

There may be a germ of truth in your generalisation:

I certainly hope so - there's no point making exaggerated stereotypical remarks unless there's at least some truth in them
no-one has ever been rude to me in Manchester, although Sheffield can be an unkind place. However, I think that ... who answered my telephone request to book a table with "No booking on Fridays" and then slammed down the phone.

Rude, rude and rude. There's no call for rudeness.

David
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There may be a germ of truth in your generalisation: no-one has ever been rude to me in Manchester, although ... who answered my telephone request to book a table with "No booking on Fridays" and then slammed down the phone.

That's the difference between Oxford and the rest of the world. In Oxford, it's considered the height of rudeness for the theater goer to be barged past. In parts of America, rudeness doesn't enter into it unless a handgun was waved.
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