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Bournemouth (wherever that is).

Th. Hardy says it's a Mediterranean lounging-place on the English Channel. Lingual imbuccality, I assume.
Mike.
(b) She mixes with intellectuals. Intellectuals in England are by ... of anti-Semitism. (A bit weak, that, but you never know.)

Anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism are unrelated, except in the mouths of the argument-deprived. You no more have to be anti-Jewish to ... of other peoples's lands, lives and human rights than you need to be Jewish to disapprove of Belsen and Auschwitz.

I thought this might happen. I am aware of the difference. I should have split that paragraph.

Mickwick
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Question Time consists of a few people on the panel deliberately offering themselves as political representatives and targets. It's not an edifying spectacle if the audience is against them, but neither is it representative of everday feelings towards everyday people.

Maybe not, but that particular edition of QT was a startling and bewildering illustration of just how coarse, callous and certain we post-deference Britons can be. A couple of days before, I had greeted the first, pre-collapse news of the crashes into the Twin Towers with: 'Well, that'll teach them.' The collapses, the death-toll and a few other things forced a re-think. That edition of QT was certainly one of those other things.

Mickwick
When it comes to politics, we're all either with America, or evil terrorist fellow-travellers. After all, that's what that nice Mr Bush told us.

I am sure you are not trying to justify the incredible and unwarranted rudeness described in the article.

No, I'm pointing out that American politics is now everyone's politics. If the 800 pound gorilla is wondering whether I'm an ally or a target, then naturally I'm interested in who's running the place.

Maybe there are economic reasons why a US-resident would want Bush as president - but from here in Europe, he's a very poor deal.
I agree it isn't representative of the majority. I* wouldn't do it. *You* wouldn't do it. But it is representative of *something.

Your fallacy here is to assume "no smoke without fire", when we don't all believe there's even any smoke. The air's clear around here.
It would never occur to me that relations between British and American people should vary according to which party is in power where. Would it to you?

Of course. How popular do you think Americans are in France ? In Pakistan ? - especially now that America is shoring up Musharraf's refusal to step down as army chief.
And?

I live in what might be thought of as a potentially anti-American area. Yet this hostility isn't evident, even here.
Why should it bother even trying when the BBC does it for them, every week?

The BBC hand-picks a left-wing audience for Question Time ? I think you need to fix the pinholes in your tinfoil hat.
It's also worth remembering that "average Joe Sixpack" doesn't hold ... UK, they are somewhat exceptional, just by having travelled abroad.

Intriguing. You start by condemning prejudice, and end by demonstrating it.

Do you think that most Americans either hold passports or travel abroad ? You'll find that they don't.
My point is that those who do travel might well be expected to hold a broader internationalist view than those who don't. The Americans we meet in the UK aren't those poor souls whose only view of the outside world is through Fox and USA Today.

Smert' spamionam
There may be a germ of truth in your generalisation: no-one has ever been rude to me in Manchester,

Well, if you wish, next time we boink in Manchester I'll be as rude as you want, and I'm sure YoungBloke could be persuaded to blow a raspberry or two in your direction.

That would be delightful (the raspberry, I mean) but Manchester is not on the itinerary for rest of this year (Liverpool, Phoenix, Key West and Nottingham are, though). YB may well be old enough to be really rude by the time we meet.

Laura
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Laura F Spira typed thus:
Well, if you wish, next time we boink in Manchester ... persuaded to blow a raspberry or two in your direction.

That would be delightful (the raspberry, I mean) but Manchester is not on the itinerary for rest of this year (Liverpool, Phoenix, Key West and Nottingham are, though). YB may well be old enough to be really rude by the time we meet.

I don't suppose any of you are going to be in Tunisia from next Saturday? No? If not, I suppose I shall have to boink alone; or with Wife who won't realise that she is boinking.

David
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Mike Lyle typed thus:

Have you seen and heard his father? There's no point in banning the cloning of humans - it was clearly possible 40 years ago.

David
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Mark Barratt typed thus:
Donna Richoux typed thus: Serves her right for living in London, which is a centre of rudeness.

In her article, Ms Gould speaks (without going into details) of similar encounters in Edinburgh and Bournemouth (wherever that is).

It's the Deep South and is populated by retired Londoners who have saved enough money to move away .

David
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On 17 Oct 2004 19:19:30 GMT, "Mark Barratt"
Donna Richoux typed thus: Serves her right for living in London, which is a centre of rudeness.

In her article, Ms Gould speaks (without going into details) of similar encounters in Edinburgh and Bournemouth (wherever that is).

We last visited London in 1979, so I can't comment on the current climate. However, I will say that we were walking in the vicinity of Westminster Abbey one day when we heard a passing couple speaking English. It was a pleasant surprise, like a sudden refreshing breeze on a sultry day, after hearing things like we assumed Japanese and German all day.
As for anti-American sentiment, if it hadn't been for one encounter I would have said that we sensed nothing more than the same cold indifference we would have expected to find in New York City.
We were to rent an RV to tour parts of southwestern England and Wales. We traveled by train to within about six blocks of the rental place somewhere in the southern outskirts of London; then we loaded all our luggage onto a flimsy wheeled contraption we had with us and pushed it down the pavement (American "sidewalk") to our destination.
I wasn't completely certain we were going right, and I wished I could ask some of the passersby for help, but I hesitated to do so because all of them were, as expected, obviously doing their best to ignore us. I finally summoned up enough courage to stop a little lady and ask if she could help us. She underwent an amazing transformation from cold indifference to warm friendliness and did all she could to try to make sure we were going to get where we wanted to go.

We decided that English people were not as hostile as we had thought, but were only extraordinarily careful to avoid seeming to intrude on others' affairs.
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