1 3 4 5  7 8 9 14
Mike Lyle typed thus:

leader Even though it is now quite usual to ... sound like an over-the-top impression of a permanently sozzled Etonian.

Have you seen and heard his father? There's no point in banning the cloning of humans - it was clearly possible 40 years ago.

Apparently Boris has been being rude about Scousers recently:- - so he can't be all bad.

Mark Barratt
Budapest
Mark Barratt wrote on 18 Oct 2004:
(b) She mixes with intellectuals. Intellectuals in England are by ... of anti-Semitism. (A bit weak, that, but you never know.)

Anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism are unrelated, except in the mouths of the argument-deprived.

And in the minds of the reason-deprived, but because most people who express their anti-Zionism are also anti-Semites, there are precious few who are truly "argument-deprived".
You no more have to be anti-Jewish to disapprove of a state founded upon the violent annexation of other peoples's lands, lives and human rights than you need to be Jewish to disapprove of Belsen and Auschwitz.

(Long and strong guffaw at the absurdity of this remark.) Then we should all disapprove of almost all states that presently exist, almost all of which were founded upon the violent annexation of other peoples' lands or extended by annexing other peoples' lands, eg Jordan and Egypt, both of which annexed parts of Palestine last century. I think you'd better do a little more thinking before making such ringing pronouncements, Mark.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
And in the minds of the reason-deprived, but because most people who express their anti-Zionism are also anti-Semites, there are precious few who are truly "argument-deprived".

it's easy enough to see why if this is to be used as justification - if non-anti-semitic anti-zionists are shouted down as anti-semites whenever they open their mouths, they learn to keep silent.
Jordan Abel wrote on 18 Oct 2004:
And in the minds of the reason-deprived, but because most ... also anti-Semites, there are precious few who are truly "argument-deprived".

it's easy enough to see why if this is to be used as justification - if non-anti-semitic anti-zionists are shouted down as anti-semites whenever they open their mouths, they learn to keep silent.

That is their problem, IMO. But I did not say that all anti-Zionists were also anti-Semites, nor do I shout down or advocate the shouting- down of anti-Zionists as anti-Semites. The two can be separate, but more often than not they are conjoined.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
It should not be news to you.

I take it you have found that kind of thing is widespread in London. Could you give us some examples, please? I ask, because, whether it should be or not, it is news to me. Mike.

I actually did give examples, although they were hypothetical. I gave an example of how in a place where 95% of people are not racists, one could expect a group that is the object of prejudice to feel the way she does, even though the majority of people do not see it. It would not necessarily require even one percent of Brits to bash Americans in order for her to be subjected to the level she reported. Widespread is a subjective term, so I could not necessarily give you an example that satisfies your definition. If one percent of airplanes that fly in the UK crashed every day, would you consider it a widespread problem?
If you read any English newspaper, you should be able to find that there is a significant enough level of American bashing that Americans could be exposed to it to the degree that she reported.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
"She (Phyllis Chesler) is unequivocal in declaring that those who accuse Israel of genocide and apartheid protesting that they ... wondering whether she is not one of those zionists who are unable (or unwilling) to distinguish between anti-zionism and anti-semitism.

Those who disagree with the genocide and apartheid arguments usually do so when the facts are taken out of context and are not applied the same way they would be in other contexts. An accusation that Israel does anything wrong is not necessarily anti-Semitic or anti-Zionist for that matter. Zionism is simply the belief in a Jewish homeland. It's possible for a person to be anti-Zionist and not necessarily anti-Semitic if that person opposes the concept of all Muslim governments or any nation with Christianity as an official religion and so forth. But most people who are anti-Zionist single out Jews as the only people not entitled to a homeland. It's not a stretch to argue that such people are anti-Semites.
I'm afraid that whilst the specifics of the reported case ... familar to anyone who comes into contact with political expression

But that's a dislike of American politics, not of Americans as people. I live in Bristol, not London. And I'm ... one madman on the bus into a national campaign, if it filled out a column ? You bet they would.

Here's another article from the Guardian that seems to confirm what you say:

Published on Friday, October 15, 2004 by the Guardian/UK Poll Reveals World Anger at Bush Eight out of 10 countries favor Kerry for president
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uselections2004/viewsofamerica/story/0,15221, 1327568,00.html
by Alan Travis
George Bush has squandered a wealth of sympathy around the world towards America since September 11 with public opinion in 10 leading countries - including some of its closest allies - growing more hostile to the United States while he has been in office.

According to a survey, voters in eight out of the 10 countries, including Britain, want to see the Democrat challenger, John Kerry, defeat President Bush in next month's US presidential election.

The poll, conducted by 10 of the world's leading newspapers, including France's Le Monde, Japan's Asahi Shimbun, Canada's La Presse, the Sydney Morning Herald and the Guardian, also shows that on balance world opinion does not believe that the war in Iraq has made a positive contribution to the fight against terror.

The results show that in Australia, Britain, Canada, France, Japan, Spain and South Korea a majority of voters share a rejection of the Iraq invasion, contempt for the Bush administration, a growing hostility to the US and a not-too-strong endorsement of Mr Kerry. But they all make a clear distinction between this kind of anti-Americanism and expressing a dislike of American people. On average 68% of those polled say they have a favourable opinion of Americans.
The 10-country poll suggests that rarely has an American administration faced such isolation and lack of public support amongst its closest allies.
The only exceptions to this trend are the Israelis - who back Bush 2-1 over Kerry and see the US as their security umbrella - and the Russians who, despite their traditional anti-Americanism, recorded unexpectedly favourable attitudes towards the US in the survey conducted in the immediate aftermath of the Beslan tragedy.

The UK results of the poll conducted by ICM research for the Guardian reveal a growing disillusionment with the US amongst the British public, fuelled by a strong personal antipathy towards Mr Bush.

The ICM survey shows that if the British had a vote in the US presidential elections on November 2 they would vote 50% for Kerry and only 22% for Bush.
Sixty per cent of British voters say they don't like Bush, rising to a startling 77% among those under 25.
The rejection of Mr Bush is strongest in France where 72% say they would back Mr Kerry but it is also very strong in traditionally very pro-American South Korea, where fears of a pre-emptive US strike against North Korea have translated into 68% support for Mr Kerry.
In Britain the growth in anti-Americanism is not so marked as in France, Japan, Canada, South Korea or Spain where more than 60% say their view of the United States has deteriorated since September
11. But a sizeable and emerging minority - 45% - of British voterssay their image of the US has got worse in the past three years and only 15% say it has improved.
There is a widespread agreement that America will remain the world's largest economic power.
This is underlined by the 73% of British voters who say that the US now wields an excessive influence on international affairs, a situation that 67% see as continuing for the foreseeable future.

A majority in Britain also believe that US democracy is no longer a model for others.
But perhaps a more startling finding from the Guardian/ICM poll is that a majority of British voters - 51% - say that they believe that American culture is threatening our own culture.

This is a fear shared by the Canadians, Mexicans and South Koreans, but it is more usually associated with the French than the British. Perhaps the endless television reruns of Friends and the Simpsons are beginning to take their toll.
7 ICM interviewed a random sample of 1,008 adults aged 18 and overby telephone between September 22-23 2004. Interviews were conducted across the country and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults.
Guardian Newspapers Limited 2004

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Bob Cunningham typed thus:
I wasn't completely certain we were going right, and I wished I could ask some of the passersby for help, ... not as hostile as we had thought, but were only extraordinarily careful to avoid seeming to intrude on others' affairs.

What you experienced was big city manners. In such a place there will always be somebody right behind you to offer assistance to the visitor, so you don't need to bother to stop if you are busy. The smaller or more remote the area, the less likely this is to happen, in which case it is incumbent on you to render assistance. This is environment based, not person based - take an individual out of the city and put him in a small town and he will adopt the small town manner.
I was standing in a street in Helsinki trying to work out, with the aid of a map, which direction I needed to walk along the street I had reached. A 30-something lady walked past (there were no other passers by); she stopped and asked me in English if she could help.

David
==
replace the first component of address
with the definite article.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Bob Cunningham typed thus:

I wasn't completely certain we were going right, and I ... extraordinarily careful to avoid seeming to intrude on others' affairs.

What you experienced was big city manners. In such a place there will always be somebody right behind you to ... lady walked past (there were no other passers by); she stopped and asked me in English if she could help.

This happened to us so frequently when we visited Washington DC two years ago that we took to examining our maps furtively to avoid helpful interruption of our pleasant bickering about where we were going.

I have to confess that I would never volunteer such help to tourists in Oxford, because I find them such an irritating inconvenience and would want to direct them to the quickest route out of town, but I am helpful if approached.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Show more