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The hotel is only a short drive __the station.

a. in

b. from

c. out of

d. up

http://www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish-central-test-test-your-level.htm

Hello,

Which is the correct answer ?

Please explain the grammar points of a,b,c and d.

Thank you.

With best wishes.

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Hi,

First, which do you think is the correct answer, and why?

Best wishes, Clive
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Hello Clive,

I think b. and c. are correct.

The answer b. "from" means to show how far apart two places are.

As for c. "out of", when we consider the whole sentence "The hotel is only a short drive out of the station." , "out" means to show a particular distance

from a place.

Thus, I cannot decide which is the most precise one.

Thank you.

With best wishes.
Hi,

The hotel is only a short drive __the station.

b. from Yes, this is correct to express 'separation'.

c. out of It's true that this is an idiomatic way of expressing separation, but we only say it in certain cases, eg 'The hotel is only a short drive out of the town'. The basic idea is that you can drive 'into the town' and 'out of the town'. Don't say it for a station. You can't really drive into a station, so you can't drive out of a station.

Best wishes, Clive