+0
Hello. I am having a difficulty understanding the phrase "in higher education note" that appeared in an article about current situation surrounding student loans in the U.S.

The phrase is a part of the following paragraph: Edward Kennedy is pushing a bill that rewards colleges for switching to the cheaper of the two lending systems by giving them additional need-based aid - a setup, many in higher education note, that is strikingly similar to the ones schools are in hot water for having negotiated with individual banks.

Does the phrase connote that the set up, is elaborated with use of big words, in order to mislead people to think it is different from the ones schools negotiated with individual banks?

Thank you so much in advance.
+0
Hi,

I am having a difficulty understanding the phrase "in higher education note" that appeared in an article about current situation surrounding student loans in the U.S.

The phrase is a part of the following paragraph: Edward Kennedy is pushing a bill that rewards colleges for switching to the cheaper of the two lending systems by giving them additional need-based aid - a setup, many in higher education note, that is strikingly similar to the ones schools are in hot water for having negotiated with individual banks.

Does the phrase connote that the set up, is elaborated with use of big words, in order to mislead people to think it is different from the ones schools negotiated with individual banks? No, you have the wrong idea here completely.

many in higher education note, This just means 'many people who work in the field of higher education note this'.

In simpler terms, it's like saying 'a setup, many people say, that is similar to . . . '

Best wishes, Clive
+0
Also:
many people observe/remark