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Hello Teachers,

I have some doubt about the usage of "in" and "into", used with the verbs of movement.

1.He jumped in the river.

2.He jumped into the river.

Somewhere I have read that in such a case, we can use either "in" or "into".

Is it correct?

Same is also true for "on" and "onto".

Thanks.
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I have some doubt about the usage of "in" and "into", used with the verbs of movement.

1.He jumped in the river.

2.He jumped into the river.

Somewhere I have read that in such a case, we can use either "in" or "into".

Is it correct?

JTT: Yup, that's correct, Hanuman. I'd say that 'into' is more common in speech and I say this, though I might be wrong, because it seems to add a bit more oomph/feeling to the sentence. By he same token, we ENLs tend to use phrasals for our everyday language.

H:
Same is also true for "on" and "onto".

JTT: Only if it was Jesus Christ or Chauncy Gardener.Emotion: smile
The same is true for "on" and "onto".

The cat jumped onto the table.
The cat jumped on the table.

The actors walked onto the stage.
The actors walked on the stage.

CJ
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I disagree.

The boy jumped in the river. This means the boy was in the river when he jumped.
The boy jumped into the river. This means the boy was out of the river and jumped in-to it.
I agree "IN" and "ON" can be used in two ways: location and direction.



  • The swimmer jumped in the pool and then she jumped twice in the pool.



  • The actor walked on the stage and then he walked around on the stage.
paco
And I agree that they are in fact used in both ways-- but I continue to teach students the rules in order to avoid the confusions that sometimes arise-- especially when both senses are included in a single sentence.
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I think an easy way to explain the phenomenon is:

at, in, on are all prepositions of place:

at is used when the place is perceived as a "point": John is at work.

in is used when the place is perceived as a "box": John is in the building.

on is used when the place is perceived as a "surface": John is on the roof.

to, into, onto are prepositions of movement, and they correspond to the ones above:

John went to work (point).

John went into the building Emotion: boxing.

John went onto the roof (surface).

The in and on you mentioned are merely shortened versions of the prepositions of movement (which unfortunately look like and thus can be confused with prepositions of place): into -> in, onto -> on.

I hope it helps.

rgds,

cairn
The cat jumped onto the table. (Indicates a cat jumping up onto a table)
The cat jumped on the table. (Indicates a cat jumping (up and down) on a table) -It is used as the preposition of movement regionally but not strictly the right grammar.
Nice explanation, Cairn.
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