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Hi,

Can you please correct this sentence if needed?

1-He put the bag into his jacket. (Given that "into" means "toward.".., can we say the sentence that way?) The word "in" implies that the thing is already in place. The word "into" means that it's going in a certain direction right? Please confirm this.

2- Can we start a sentence with "so". I've been taught not to do that in general. However, I have a colleague who insists that it's correct to use it at the beginning of a sentence. Can you help me understand this?

Sentences: I can't read. Therefore, I have my sister read for me. OR I can't read. So, I have my sister read for me.

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Thanks,

MVB
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Welcome to English Forums!

MVBThe word "in" implies that the thing is already in place. The word "into" means that it's going in a certain direction right?
In most cases, yes. "into" implies motion. "in" implies position. Nevertheless, "in" is also sometimes used in cases of motion, though "into" is preferable. But "into" is not used in cases of position.

He put it into his jacket. OR He put it in his jacket pocket.

We went into the house. OR We went in the house.

We are in the garage. NOT We are into the garage.

They were standing in the kitchen. NOT They were standing into the kitchen.

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MVBCan we start a sentence with "so".
You can, but the sentence that starts with "so" should be related appropriately to the sentence(s) that come before it. I don't recommend starting with "so", but it's not always wrong.

MVBI can't read. So, I have my sister read for me.
I don't say that this is wrong, but I prefer, I can't read, so I have my sister read for me.

CJ
Comments  
With regards to part 2 of your question, 'so' is often formally taught as being a classifier and thus not to be used to start a sentence. That said, many very educated native speakers of English do begin sentences with 'so' and other coordinators. So, whether it is right or wrong really depends on your perspective, your style, or which publishing company is being being used. It is also important that to remember that there is no official rule book or body that decides what is right and what is wrong in English (unlike in French); therefore, there is no official answer to this question.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.