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hi everybody. this is my first post. which one is correct - the company is continuously in search FOR/OF employees?
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Zhurickihi everybody. this is my first post. which one is correct - the company is continuously in search FOR/OF employees?
The company is continuously in search of employees.

The company is continuously searching for employees.
Zhurickihi everybody. this is my first post. which one is correct - the company is continuously in search FOR/OF employees?
Pioussoul gave a great response. Welcom to EnglishForward.com!!
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Why not comment on the what you found, Peter?

Are you disputing the responses from Pioussoul and Philip? (I hope not.)

Or do you have a question about what you found?
"(I hope not.) "

Why do you hope that, Yankee?

I found many hits for 'in search for' at NYT, which means 'in search for' is used by educated editors.

This is all I wanted to imply.
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Inchoateknowledge
"(I hope not.) "

Why do you hope that, Yankee?

Well, it's a different sort of context. It's a headline. And I guess you know that words are often omitted from headlines -- as is the case in your headline.

Edit:

Headlines often omit words that are never omitted in "normal" text or speech.
hello Yankee

Which word/s is/are omitted.

thanks
The headline is:

Body Discovered in Search for Florida Girl, 13

That's typical "headline English". The headline means:

A body has been discovered in the search for a missing thirteen-year-old Florida girl.

From what I can see at the NYT website, there are these wordings later in the text of the same article:

"... Saturday in a search for the teenager, some hugging ..."

"... involved in the search for Sarah..."
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