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What is difference between " in terms of " and " in terms that " ?

Also would you give me examples ?

Thank you
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Hi,

" in terms of " This is a common phrase used to define the manner in which something should be looked at or discussed. The phrase is usually followed by a noun or a noun clause.

eg I want to discuss politics in terms of ethics.

eg Let's look at your essay in terms of the tenses you have used.

"in terms that" is not a standard phrase with a clear meaning. It's just a fragment of a sentence,

eg I want to discuss politics in terms that you can understand.

Best wishes, Clive
Hello Clive,
Does your example sentence "I want to discuss politics in terms that you can understand" mean that the speaker wants to discuss politics on a level the other party understands or he wants to discuss it so the other can understand politics better from that point? What else can I use if I want not a noun but a dependent clause to follow. Eg.: This event will be casual in terms of that it won't have that corporate atmosphere that is so typical of banquets.
How could I formulate this sentence correctly and at the same time make it sound "more English"?
Thank you!
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Does your example sentence "I want to discuss politics in terms that you can understand" mean that the speaker wants to discuss politics on a level the other party understands or he wants to discuss it so the other can understand politics better from that point? Could be either.

What else can I use if I want not a noun but a dependent clause to follow.
Eg.: This event will be casual in terms of that it won't have that corporate atmosphere that is so typical of banquets. This is not a correct sentence. One reason is that you can't say . . . .in terms of that . . . . Please look again at my examples.

How could I formulate this sentence correctly and at the same time make it sound "more English"?
eg: This event will be casual in terms of atmosphere. It won't have that corporate atmosphere that is so typical of banquets.


Clive
Thanks!
Could I swap 'in terms of' with 'in a sense'?
This event will be casual in a sense that it won't have that corporate atmosphere....
Yes, definitely, better.

But in the sense that . . . .
You are describing a specific sense.

Clive
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So when can I use 'in a sense that'? I guess it's daytime in Canada now because I didn't expect such a quick reply at such a late hour :-)
Thanks again for taking the time to help me!
in the sense that is close to being a fixed expression..

in a sense that It's hard to think of a good example of his. Perhaps
eg I love you in a sense that I can't explain.
eg He used the word in a sense that was new to me.

Clive