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In fact, a drug is being developed from the chemicals in the frogs' skin. In tests, it has been much more effective than other drugs in stopping pain.
... In test ... killing ...

Hi,
Does the second in the above sound as right and mean about the same as the first?
Besides, why does the similar pattern, in theory or in practice, use the singular noun after "in," while "in tests" the plural noun? Could you dig up a reason? Thanks.
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'in" has no preference for singulat or plural.
Use what makes sense. Here, use the plural, since they probably did more than one test.
Practice and theory are non-count nouns in this context.

"Stopping" is better.
Comments  
AlpheccaStars 'in" has no preference for singulat or plural.

Use what makes sense. Here, use the plural, since they probably did more than one test.

Practice and theory are non-count nouns in this context.

"Stopping" is better.

Thanks, AlpheccaStars.
But why is "stopping" better? I don't get it because I run across "painkiller" more often than not.