Hi, I've just finished a paper and my tutor drew my attention to a phrase. Basically, in order to draw attention to or refer to a specific exercise, incident, etc., I tend to write: 'In the given exercise', 'In the given task', 'in the given situtation. My supervisor told me that this was wrong use, as given would usually be used in phrases like, 'any given'. I am familiar with that phrase but no one has ever drawn my attention to 'in the given' being wrong. So could you please let me know whether or not my usage of 'in the given' is proper English? Thanks, A-M
Can you give us an example of one of your sentences which was criticized?

Please include the sentence which precedes it.

Without prior context, I would use "in a given task, the time factor must be considered."

Of course, "any" would also be correct in my example. (The idea would basically be the same.)

With the definite article, there should be something for it to refer to.

That is, the "given task" must be given, or at least some "formula" should be given which defines it. Emotion: smile

Thanks, - A.

Welcome to English Forums, annemarie. Thank you for joining us! Emotion: happy
the paper is on a project that I did this year. Here is an example:

In order to make the pupls even more conscious of their own work, raising awareness can also be accomplished by having pupils assess each other's work. In the given project formative assessment was going to be given much more weight, as it was going to develop their abilities further.

Having omitted a number of words, the pupils had to come up with their own alternatives, justifying their choice. The given activity was intended to support the process of meaning making.

Thanks,

A-M
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Hi,

the paper is on a project that I did this year. Here is an example:

In order to make the pupls even more conscious of their own work, raising awareness can also be accomplished by having pupils assess each other's work. In the given project formative assessment was going to be given much more weight, as it was going to develop their abilities further.

Having omitted a number of words, the pupils had to come up with their own alternatives, justifying their choice. The given activity was intended to support the process of meaning making.

As I suggested, consider saying 'In this project', since you have already mentioned theproject.

And why not just say 'This activity'?

You should also consider making your writing less wordy and more direct.

eg instead of raising awareness can also be accomplished by having pupils assess each other's work.

how about the teacher can raise their awareness by having them assess each other's work ?

CliveEmotion: smile
Okay, I think I get it. I suspect you're using "given" to mean "in the project which was given to the student, etc."

If I understand this, your usage is not technically incorrect. But "given" as an adjective is typically used to mean "the one referred to," not the one assigned.

I hope I'm getting this across. It's a little tricky. (And it may not even be what your advisor is objecting to.) Emotion: thinking

- A.

Edit. Upon further "reading," I realize that "the given project" refers to your entire project, which is the subject of your paper.

I agree with your advisor that this would not be a natural usage.

There's usually the idea that one of a number of items/options has been selected.

In your case, as far as we know, this is the only project that exists.

You should be able to substitute "selected" for "given."

"In the selected project, formative assessment was going to be given etc." I don't think this is what you mean.

I'd say that your "tendency" to use "given" in this way might be reconsidered. Emotion: nodding - A.
You've just opened my eyes. I suspect that my advisor thought that I wanted to say 'project which was given to the student, etc.' as in 'it was handed to them'. However, I used it as an adjective to refer to the project I was talking about. If 'given ti' can be used as a synonym for 'referred to' then my usage was correct.

Thanks,

A-M
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