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1. Does "them" in the text below refer to "less conscious things" or "readers" or "the author"

2. Do you think "in the title" here means "briefly" or something like "in the title of this chapter of the book"?


3. Does "and that express themselves in submerged form in and through their works" mean "and writers and literary institutions themselves express this logic in submerged form in and through their works"?


Text:

There are two levels to this truth in fiction. The first is the more conscious one of an author who is permitted to say things in fictionalized form that he or she might not be permitted or willing to say openly. Satirists from Molière to Mary MaCarthy found it more convenient to describe the social relations of their time and place in semificticious form. There is less chance of losing friends and creating enemies in this way. The second concerns the way less conscious things may be revealed to readers, in the same or different time and place than the author, about the social constraints that shape them. These are the “rules of art” referred to in the title: the logic that writers and literary institutions obey and that express themselves in submerged form in and through their works.

Comments  
catttt1. Does "them" in the text below refer to "less conscious things" or "readers" or "the author"

readers

catttt3. Does "and that express themselves in submerged form in and through their works" mean "and writers and literary institutions themselves express this logic in submerged form in and through their works"?

No. The rules of art express themselves. This writer is not very careful of the grammar, so the two items after the colon are so unparallel that the reader has to go a-hunting.