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If I'm solving eg. a 400-piece puzzle and I'm halfway through,
do I have:
1) two hundred pieces already in their place, or
2) two hundred pieces already in their places?

Can I use either of the two?
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Hi,

If I'm solving eg. a 400-piece puzzle and I'm halfway through,
do I have:
1) two hundred pieces already in their place, or
2) two hundred pieces already in their places?

Can I use either of the two?
Yes, or you could say 'two hundred pieces already in place'.

But none of these seem idiomatic. I'd just say 'I've already done 200 pieces'.

Best wishes, Clive

Comments  
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Since I'm not a native speaker, I don't always get the right 'feeling', so to speak, with two slightly differing idioms.

So, is there a difference meaning between these sentences:
1. They shared their lives with us.
2. They shared their life with us.

I'd use 1., but that's just my feeling(s?)...
Hi,

#2 sounds a bit like they are eg a married couple.

Clive
Which one is most commonly used? The first?
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Hi,

You need to consider the context.

Who are these people? In what way did they share?

Clive