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Is there any difference in meaning?
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The most obvious choice is between "these days" and "in those days". The former refers to the present time, and the latter to a past time. E.g.:

"I don't drink much these days." (present)

"I didn't drink much in those days." (past)

If I've misunderstood the question then please provide some example sentences.
These days - now/recently.

Those days - past/a period some time ago.

For example;

I work very hard these days.

Those days were the best days of my life.
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Well, I have noticed that they are used interchangably in refrence to the present
Mieszko PowroznikWell, I have noticed that they are used interchangably in refrence to the present

Either you have misheard, mis-understood or the speaker iis wrong! The only exception I can think of is if you were is talking about something that isn't a daily occurence.

Those days when I work until late I can get something to eat out. I still think that most natives speakers would say " the days when......"
Can I use "these days" for the future time?
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AnonymousCan I use "these days" for the future time?
I don't see how you could. Do you have a hopeful example?
Maybe he thought something like "...and one of these days we'll go home..."
You can schedule me for these days
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