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Hello everyone! I'd like to ask whether the following two phrases are interchangeable. The phrases are: in turn and in its/her/their etc. turn. The reason that I'm asking is that I was once told by a native speaker that 'in turn' is the only correct way of saying this. For example, in the sentence: "As we were told at the lecture, each category, in turn, is divided into..." is it possible to say - each category, in its turn,...?
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I think that person was right.

I've just verified:
"each category, in its turn"
is very rare at Yahoo,
thus probably non-standard
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Hello Kind

Yes, that's right: "in turn" is the one for your context.

MrP
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Comments  
Kind VillainHello everyone! I'd like to ask whether the following two phrases are interchangeable. The phrases are: in turn and in its/her/their etc. turn. The reason that I'm asking is that I was once told by a native speaker that 'in turn' is the only correct way of saying this. For example, in the sentence: "As we were told at the lecture, each category, in turn, is divided into..." is it possible to say - each category, in its turn,...?
The two phrases convey two different meanings and therefore they are not interchangeable.
- in turn : in due order of succession
- turn: a time when somebody gets an opportunity to do something or somebody is asked to do something, especially when this is rotated among other people
  1. It's your turn to clean up.
  2. I will do it in my turn.
According to your explanation, the first meaning is the more appropriate in my sentence. Right?
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 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.
Your words mean: trust others but believe in yourself. The phrase 'in its turn' was given in my text-book by a professional teacher. She's not native, which proves the words I wrote at the very beginning.