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I have made up an example below.

(ex) John plans to put his young son in a tutoring center to learn more English.

Some of my non-native English speaking friends think my sentence sounds like John is the one who wants to learn more English, not his son.

May I ask two questions?

(A) Do you agree with my friends?

(B) I am trying to say that John's son is the one who wants to learn more English. If you agree with my friends, how do you correct it to make it give the intended meaning?

Thank you very much for your help.

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(A) Yes.

(B) John plans to put his young son in a tutoring center so that his son can learn more English.

CB

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This kind of ambiguity is ubiquitous and unremarkable. The meaning would normally be clear within the context.

A better crafted sentence would be somewhat like this:

So that his young son will learn more English, John plans to enroll him in a tutoring center.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  

(A) Personally, I think I disagree with your friends. Because the sentence itself has expressed clearly that John's son is the one who wants to learn more English: John plans to put HIS YOUNG SON in tutoring center to LEARN MORE ENGLISH. You see, the young son is planned to put in a tutoring center to learn more English by John

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