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The sentences:
Younger people look dispassionately at their cultural traditions and simply pull out the elements that they like. The older generation sees this as a loss of identity, but it could as easily be interpreted as a search for a new identity in which one does not fit himself to the past but makes the past fit him. This is not a rejection of that past, but neither is it an uncritical embrace.


What does 'in which' refer to here? 'A search' or 'a new identity'?
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Try looking at it this way:

. . . a search for a new identity, one in which makes the past fit him. . .
What?? In which makes??

Casi (or Casiopea, which is your name in another site), please...
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'In which' seems to modify 'search' to me, Taka. The structure is awkward, though, isn't it?

I vote for "search".

"In this search one does not fit himself ... but makes ..." makes more sense than "In this identity one does not fit himself ... but makes ..." -- to me, anyway.

Emotion: smile

CJ
Awkward it is. And Confusing--that's why I'm here asking a question, as always. Emotion: smile

But your interpretation is the same as mine, and I'm relieved now. Thanks!

One more question, MM.

About 'as easily', as easily as what? As the older generation sees this as a loss of identity?
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Thank you too, CJ!

What do you think about the other question that I added?
'Looking dispassionately and pulling out the elements' can considered a search for a new identity as easily as it can be considered a loss of identity.

That's how I read it, Taka.
OK. Thanks, MM.
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