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Hi everyone,
I'd be very grateful if you could help me with some sentences in English. I would like to know whether the following sentences are correct.

My brother's 12th birthday party was the worst party I've been in --> Does this sentence sound correct to your ears? I'm trying to sound as formal as possible. Would the sentence be incorrect if we don't say that in at the end of it? I'm not sure if we have to put it necessarily.

In what/which party were you last night? what/which party were you last night in? --> Are these two sentence correct?

Thank you very much,

PS: Feel free to correct my mistakes Emotion: big smile
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You are in a show, a play, a performance.

You are at a party, or you go to a party.

His party was the worst you've ever been to.

What party were you at last night?

Which party (of the three that you got invited to) did you go to last night?
Grammar GeekYou are in a show, a play, a performance.
Emotion: surprise
Hi GG,
is it really "in a show"? I thought (and I was told) it was always "on" a show. Maybe there isn't even a rule for that... I've never understood which preposition I have to use with "program", "TV series", "commercial", etc. It seems you all pick those preposition at random (were "you all" means "you Americans" Emotion: wink)

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K, you could be ON the Oprah show (a tv show) but IN your variety show at school. And hey, don't just blame the Americans. I'm pretty sure our British and Australian and other English speaking cousins are just as random.
Hi,

Here is how I understand:

1. In a show = taking part as a member of the cast.
2. On a show = being seen on TV.
3. At a show = being present (could be anybody, including the audience).

If I watch Oprah on TV and see you, I see you on her show. If you and I are in the audience, I see you at her show. Audience cannot be in her show.

Best wishes,
Hoa Thai
Thanks.
Hmm, I'm so confused, but I think that maybe I am starting to understand why I never understand...
So maybe "on" gives you the idea of "television", and "in" doesn't.
That could be the reason why it seems to me native speakers say both "in a commercial" and "on a commercial", "in an episode" and "on an episiode"... even though I was told to always use a fixed preposition for those (for example "on a show", period), or I was told nothing because no one answered me (incomplete threads).
What do you think?
Thanks Emotion: smile
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You're in a commerical.

I didn't know that he was in that episode.

Mom, guess what? I'm going to be on TV! Yup, I got a role in a commercial. I think the casting director really liked me, so he said he's looking for a role in an upcoming episode of As the Grammar Turns. If that works out well, I could get a recurring role on that show.
Grammar GeekYou're in a commerical.

I didn't know that he was in that episode.

Mom, guess what? I'm going to be on TV! Yup, I got a role in a commercial. I think the casting director really liked me, so he said he's looking for a role in an upcoming episode of As the Grammar Turns. If that works out well, I could get a recurring role on that show.
So I'm going to see you in a commerical, not on a commerical, right?

What a mess... you just said you could get a role on that show... you used "on". So when is it "in" or something else? Do you agree with what Hoa said?

Wow, this is what I love about this board - it really makes you think about why we choose the words we do.

"On" does give the idea of television, but we also would say "on Broadway" in certain circumstances. I wonder if it's a sense of less involvement, less depth. Here is a (random!) list of examples:

I saw him on Oprah's show last month.

He was a regular on Saturday Night Live.

I will never forget seeing Carol Channing on Broadway.

There are some really funny commercials on TV these days. They've got some good writers working on those commercials, and some good actors working in them.

but...

He played Dr. Feelgood in General Hospital.

I saw Carol Channing in Hello, Dolly.

He played a conehead in a skit on Saturday Night Live.

Not sure if this is helpful, or just adds to the confusion...
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