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Hi people!

I'd like to know whether the abbreviation "Inc." is the American equivalent for British "Ltd."

And here's another question:

If we should translate a legal document containing this word, from British English to American English (or viceversa), should we keep the term as part of the company name or should we still translate it? I'm asking this because legal systems differ in both countries.

Thanks a lot!

Mara.
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Hi,

I'd like to know whether the abbreviation "Inc." is the American equivalent for British "Ltd." 'Inc' means 'incorporated, as a corporation'. ' Ltd.' refers to a company, with limited liablility. I think what you are really asking is about the difference between a company and a corporation. Perhaps you should post this on the legal forum to get a proper legal definition.

If we should translate a legal document containing this word, from British English to American English (or viceversa), should we keep the term as part of the company name or should we still translate it? I'm asking this because legal systems differ in both countries. Again, I can't give a legal opinion, but I feel that you shouldn't start changing names - a name is a name, regardless of the local legal system.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
I know this is an old post but in case anyone else looks here just wanted to add - do not change the ltd to inc. for translations - precisely because the terms are not always completely the same (german see. gmbh etc) its common and correct to leave the original - if necessary with a footnote (British equivalent of.... or even more detail depending on the target readers) but business people will be well aware of the different types so often no explanation would be needed at all!