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Is anyone else offended by the increasing use of the word "including" immediately before prepositional phrases? Some examples:

1. Our work so far this year leads us to highlight two main areas where states need to use all means at their disposal, to give effect to and ensure respect for the absolute prohibition of torture and other ill-treatment, including in the context of countering terrorism.

2. This set [of floor mats] covers the entire cab floor including under the seats.

3. There is a risk of kidnapping when travelling by road, including to rural tourist
destinations such as Ciudad Perdida (The Lost City).

Instinctively, I chafe when I see this, but I have a hard time explaining to communication professionals WHY it is wrong. Does the customary use of "including" function as a preposition? If so, it would be illogical to follow one preposition with another. Or is "including" more properly described as a participial adjective? Can anyone help? The more thorough the explanation, the better.
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Hello Anon

I am an English learner from Japan. Your question is very interesting. I looked for “including” in OED and Webster and found neither of them gives any entry for “including” as a preposition. They only explain it as an infinite form of the verb “include”. Since the verb “include” is transitive, it should be always followed by any noun or noun phrase. So, strictly speaking, all of the examples you presented are grammatically wrong. However, one might take them as an elided sentence where some noun or noun phrase is omitted:

1. Our work so far this year leads us to highlight two main areas where states need to use all means at their disposal, to give effect to and ensure respect for the absolute prohibition of torture and other ill-treatment, including (those) in the context of countering terrorism.
2. This set of floor mats covers the entire cab floor including (the parts) under the seats.
3. There is a risk of kidnapping when traveling by road, including (roads) to rural tourist destinations such as Ciudad Perdida (The Lost City).

paco
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AnonymousI share your discomfort with the usage that you describe.
I hope you realise you are replying to a thread that has lain dormant for ten years.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
I have seen "including" listed as a preposition (Roget's Thesauraus), but I'm not sure that two prepositions in a row is wrong in itself. ("I was unable to vacuum out all the dust from under the couch.")
The construction strikes me as awkward more than "chafing" or "wrong".
While "as well as" doesn't exactly match the meaning of "including", I think it can be used as a substitute in many cases. Sometimes "even" will do the trick. That said, a more drastic rewording may be necessary to remove all the awkwardness in some cases.
I don't think there is a grammatical explanation that proves conclusively that this construction is "wrong". It seems to me it's more a question of style.

ensure respect for the absolute prohibition of torture and other ill-treatment, even in the context of countering terrorism
covers the entire cab floor including the area under the seats
when travelling by road, even (when travelling) to rural tourist
destinations such as Ciudad Perdida

CJ
I share your discomfort with the usage that you describe. Since "including" is itself a preposition, one does not expect a preposition immediately after. Rather, my expectation is that immediately after "including" there will be a noun or pronoun (sometimes modified) that refers to a subset of what comes immediately before. For example: "I have visited several foreign countries, including Neverland." Or, "You need to repaint the entire wall, including the wooden baseboard."

Each of the 3 examples you provide could be reworked accordingly, e.g. "This set [of floor mats] covers the entire cab floor, including the small area under the seats."
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 fivejedjon's reply was promoted to an answer.

Does anyone know the origin of this awkward usage of "including" without a following noun? Or what influenced that usage?