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My boss frequently drafts contracts for engineering projects. When presenting fee information he often writes: "Lump sum fee of $2,385, including reimbursable expenses." I think this can be interpreted as $2,385 plus reimbursable expenses added to the lump sum amount and not included in the $2,385.

Is the above the same as, "The lump sum fee, including reimbursable expenses, is $2,385" or "The lump sum fee is $2,385 includes reimbursable expenses. I think these more clearly indicates the total - no more, no less.

What's the best way to present this?

Thanks.
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Hi Anon,

I think the word order in your boss's version is technically correct, but your versions are probably less likely to be misinterpreted (assuming you change the word "is" to "of" in the second one, that is). HOWEVER, I also think the use of the word "reimbursable" might lead some people to believe that expense costs will be added to the amount of the lump sum fee -- especially with your boss's word order.
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To me, "lump sum fee.." sounds unprofessional. Fees, charges and costs can be interchangeable, depending on the context. Does what you referred to as "lump sum" a total amount of unpaid balance?. If so, to eliminate any doubts, perhaps you may want to use "....total amount is 2,385, including reimbursable expenses".
Anonymous I think this can be interpreted as $2,385 plus reimbursable expenses added to the lump sum amount and not included in the $2,385.

Absolutely not. What you said not only is confusing but also countrary to the intended statement, and it meant: The reimbursable expenses is additional to the $2,385,
Anonymous "Lump sum fee of $2,385, including reimbursable expenses."
This said: $2,385 is the total amount (including all the expensives/ fee and etc..)

Consider this: You just had a lavish birthday celebration in a fancy restaurant and after all your friends left, the captain gave you the check and he said "the total came to $2,385; including the wines and tax". But he added,''the 15% gratuity is not included".
Hi Dimsum
dimsumexpressTo me, "lump sum fee.." sounds unprofessional. Fees, charges and costs can be interchangeable, depending on the context. Does what you referred to as "lump sum" a total amount of unpaid balance?
There is nothing unprofessional about the term "lump sum". And a "lump sum fee" (the term being used by the poster's boss when contracts are drawn up) is a fixed charge that contains all costs. In theory, the use of that term alone should be enough to ensure that the boss's sentence is not misunderstood by anyone.
dimsumexpressAbsolutely not. What you said not only is confusing but also countrary to the intended statement, and it meant: The reimbursable expenses is additional to the $2,385,
Clearly, the poster already knows what the boss's intended meaning is. As I understand the poster, the primary question here is whether the boss's wording might be misinterpreted by others.
Hi Amy,
Thanks for your commenting. I have never heard of "a lump sum fee" used in an invoice or any billing from a vendor. I understand what a "lump sum" is and since the original sentence wasn't very clear on the entire context in which is used, I had assumed it was a payment of some sort. It's my opinion that it didn't sound professional. I supposed the quesitons was whether "including, inclusive or included" should be used. And I tried to help with that basis. That's all!
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