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I was on a website and could not determine if its usage of conjunctions was correct: Click here for the website .

The website has this to say about using and as a conjunction:

To suggest that one idea is in contrast to another (frequently replaced by but in this usage): "Juanita is brilliant and Shalimar has a pleasant personality."

My problem is that I believe a comma should come before and. Both of the sentences could be split into independent clauses; however, they may be wrongfully represented independent clauses.

Another part of this website talks about correlative conjunction. I was looking at a part of the website and believe that passive voice would have been a better consider. Otherwise, a comma was necessary within the sentence to take away ambiguity.

But is my concern a concern of style?

"Whether you win this race or lose it doesn't matter as long as you do your best."


Shouldn't this sentence be as follows:

Whether you win this race or lose it, doesn't matter as long as you do your best.
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Hello GW-- welcome to English Forums.

1-- That is overall a reliable website, and I recommend it. It may have been an oversight not to use a comma after brilliant-- only because it is a grammar site and has duty of care. Nevertheless, it is common, and accepted by many, to omit commas in short and especially contrasting independent clauses, as unnecessary and rather cluttering. I certainly do so.

2-- Your second example, however, should not have a comma after lose it, because you cannot separate a subject from its verb by a single comma. Here, the subject is Whether you win this race or lose it and the verb is doesn't matter.
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Juanita is brilliant and Shalimar has a pleasant personality.

Here you just give the attributes of Juanita and Shalimar, who are sisters for example.

Juanita is brilliant, and Shalimar has a pleasant personality.

There must be a reason for a comma. For example someone has just said: "Juanita has a pleasant personality and Shalimar is brilliant." You are sure that the one confused their attributes and you reply: "No, no, no. Juanita is brilliant, and Shalimar has a pleasant personality." If you do not have a reason like this, there is no comma.

"Whether you win this race or lose it doesn't matter as long as you do your best."

You can't use one comma here except "Whether you win this race or lose, it doesn't matter as long as you do your best." (but read ahead).

If you want to you can use two: "Whether you win this race, or lose [it], it doesn't matter as long as you do your best."This is a light of irony, almost a joke. There is a similar joke in "I love you, even though you are my sister." which confuses what "love" really means here Emotion: surprise) (I said that to my sister when she made me mad.)

However, if you read carefully "Whether you win this race or lose it doesn't matter as long as you do your best." it just does not sound proper... "Whether you win or lose this race it doesn't matter as long as you do your best." Only this way both "win" and "lose" are equalized. In "Whether you win this race or lose it doesn't matter as long as you do your best." there is a tiny moment of the said joke. Why "lose" is so distant?

"Whether you win this race or lose it it doesn't matter as long as you do your best." is better. Yet, now you can place one comma, and better you do it because you have "it" doubled, "it it": "Whether you win this race or lose it, it doesn't matter as long as you do your best." which is inversion from "It doesn't matter whether you win this race or lose it as long as you do your best."
Whether you win this race or lose doesn't matter, as long as you do your best.