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Hi,

I am reading a English reference book but I am not sure if I am right about the sentence.

It says," So How you respond to being asked to fill in a form depends on: ..."

I am not sure why this sentence can have two verbs. If it is because "How you respond to being asked to fill in a form" is a nominal clause?

So where do we put the conjunction "that"? And I guess it is optional to show it?

Can we change the nominal clause to a phrasal noun like:
"So how you responding to being asked to fill in a form depends on..."?

Is the puntuation correct in the sentence above?

Thanks,

Ryan
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" So How you respond to being asked to fill in a form depends on: ..."

I guess I'll have to read your English reference book.

The main verb of the clause is "depends."
If I had to pick a single-word simple subject, it would have to be "how."

The "second" verb, "respond," is part of the complete subject of the clause.
I don't hear it as a finite verb, but I'd hate to call it an infinitive.

"So how you responding to being asked to fill in a form depends on..."?

This is ungrammatical.

How you respond depends etc.
How you are responding depends etc.
Your response depends etc.
Your responding depends etc.

These all work.

"to being asked to fill in a form" is a prepositional phrase acting adverbially to modify "respond."

I don't find any use for a conjunction here (eg. "that").

I'm sure someone else will come along who can put this in the perspective of your reference book.

Re your question about punctuation, I don't know which sentence you refer to.

Best wishes, - A. Emotion: smile
Comments  
I really haven't thought much about this sort of sentence. (Maybe you could tell.) Emotion: smile
I'll follow your other replies with interest.

Tell me how you do it. (a short sentence with two verbs.)

What kind of a verb is "do" in this sentence?

Would this be a job for the ubiquitous "that"?

Tell me how that you do it.

We obviously have two clauses here.

So how that you respond to being asked depends etc.

This seems possible. But "that" no longer seems like a conjunction - nor a pronoun.