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We know that infinitive clauses can sometimes refer to adjectives before nouns. I feel with what adjectives they can do that, but I don't have any reason for it.

Examples;

You can buy the best book to read. = You can buy the book which is the best to read.

I have enough money to go to Italy. = I have money that is enough to go to Italy.

I met a nice friend to hang out with. = I met a friend who is nice to hang out with.

Whereas the sentences above are okay, why are the following ones wrong?

(If they are also correct, then there is no problem, but someone said they were wrong. I am not sure.)

I saw the ready machine to run for 10 hours =? I saw the machine which is ready to run for 10 hours.

I met a motivated person to win the competition. =? I met a person who is motivated to win the competition.

I have an eager girlfriend to hang out outside. =? I have a girlfriend who is eager to hang out outside.

Thank you very much in advance.

+1

Is it just a question of who/what is the implied subject of the infinitive?

You can buy the best book to read.
I have enough money to go to Italy.
I met a nice friend to hang out with.

*I saw the ready machine to run for 10 hours.
*I met a motivated person to win the competition.
*I have an eager girlfriend to hang out outside.

The implied subject, or intended subject, is in bold; asterisk means incorrect sentence.

This theory would be invalidated if counterexamples can be found, of course.

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The question is why "I met a nice friend to hang out with" is correct whereas "I met a motivated person to win the competition" is incorrect?

Jawel

The question is why "I met a nice friend to hang out with" is correct whereas "I met a motivated person to win the competition" is incorrect?

This is the question that I attempted to answer.

The sentences you are trying to make have a relative clause where the helping verb and the relative pronoun are optional and omitted. The adjective is the complement of the omitted verb, and refers to the omitted relative pronoun.

I saw the ready machine (that was) ready to run for 10 hours.

I met a motivated person (who was) motivated to win the competition.

I have an eager a girlfriend (who is) eager to hang out outside.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
AlpheccaStarswhere the helping verb
What do you mean by "helping verb"?

Well, I found some sentences with "a motivated person to do smt" and "an eager person to do smt".

- We are looking for a motivated person to work in a fast-paced automotive environment.

(https://www.facebook.com/AuffenbergCars/posts/570303382994242 )

- What sense is there in hiring a motivated person to do a job?

(https://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/management/making-employee-motivation-a-partnership )

- Alex Ritchie in Sydney who was an eager person to look at items and sometimes commented which sounded favorable enough to keep me looking for more ...

(https://books.google.hu/books?id=7DgqCwAAQBAJ&pg=PT10&lpg=PT10&dq=%22an+eager+person+to%22&source... )

- Louis County seeking an eager person to join our Front Desk team.

(https://www.indeed.com/q-City-of-Bella-Villa,-Mo-jobs.html )


So we can see these kinds of examples, do they all mean that these kinds of usages are correct? Because there is no difference between these examples and my examples.

JawelBecause there is no difference between these examples and my examples.

The new examples are of a different nature. For example:

"We are looking for a motivated person to work in a fast-paced automotive environment."
It does not mean a person motivated to do that. It means a person to do that, and that person is motivated.

"Louis County seeking an eager person to join our Front Desk team."
It does not mean a person eager to do that. It means a person to do that, and that person is eager.

The same for the others.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

But do you think that your sentences make sense?

If they are not interested in for what that person is motivated, why did they say: "motivated" ?

What if that person is motivated to work on a different subject?

Would you want someone who is motivated(for what? it is not sure) to work in your company?

Just "being motivated" is not enough, we need to say something more after "motivated".

Don't you agree with me?

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