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Hello,
Example: She strolled over to join them.
I have learned that intransitive/ intransitive phrasal verb can not take infinitive phrase; however example above shows that we can use infinitive phrase after intransitive phrasal verb. where infinitive phrase is to join them and stroll over is intransitive phrasal verb. Could please explain me ?

Thanks

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There is no rule that phrasal verbs cannot be followed by infinitive clauses.

Here are some examples.

He backed up to avoid hitting the pedestrians.
The Kingsleys dropped by to visit us yesterday.
The medics stood by to assist the wounded.
Every day, I work out to get some exercise.
Come up to see me sometime.
Mom has to get up to feed the baby several times a night.
The repairman finally showed up to do the job.
He went back to pick up the keys he had dropped.

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ashay2018I have learned that intransitive/ intransitive phrasal verb can not take infinitive phrase

I think you misunderstood something in the explanation you read. Did it say anything about infinitives as complements? This would exclude infinitives of purpose such as the one you see in your example.

CJ

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ashay2018I have learned that intransitive/ intransitive phrasal verb

And there is another point here.

An intransitive verb is one that does not take an object. That is what "intransitive" means.

Some verbs can be either transitive or intransitive, depending on the meaning and context.

Susan can drive. (intransitive)
Susan can drive an 18-wheeler. (transitive)

People eat too fast these days. (intransitive)
People eat too much junk food these days. (transitive)
I like to eat strawberries. (infinitive clause as a complement)

Phrasal verbs can be intransitive or transitive.
The examples in my earlier post were intransitive. The infinitive clauses were adjuncts, not complements.

Infinitive clauses as complements of transitive phrasal verbs are rare. I cannot think of one example.

Transitive verbs that take infinitives and gerund/ participle clauses are called catenative verbs. They are quite common.



Comments  
ashay2018Example: She strolled over to join them.I have learned that intransitive/ intransitive phrasal verb can not take infinitive phrase; however example above shows that we can use infinitive phrase after intransitive phrasal verb. where infinitive phrase is to join them and stroll over is intransitive phrasal verb. Could please explain me ?

I'd say that in the clause She strolled over to join them there's an understood but missing element, namely the idiomatic phrase "in order to". Note that the verb to join is a verb of purpose in that clause. In other words, the separation of the clause to join them from the intransitive "strolled over" is implied: She strolled over [in order to] join them.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
ashay2018She strolled over to join them.

I'd say that the clause She strolled over is the main clause and the non-finite clause to join them is an adjunct, not a complement, in She strolled over to join them.

anonymousthe non-finite clause to join them is an adjunct

Correct.

CJ

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.