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In these structures below,

1. A of B to-infinitive

2. A of B on C to-infinitive

3. A of B on C of D to-infinitive

4. A + preposition + B to-infinitive

(A,B,C,D are nouns or noun phases)

Q1) According to context, in structures 1,2,3,4, can to-infinitive be analyzed as modifying A?

Q2) According to context, in structure 2 and 3, can to-infinitive be analyzed as modifying B?

Q3) According to context, in structure 3, can to-infinitive be analyzed as modifying C?

Could you answer my three questions with examples?

As for structure 4, I think that the similar example would be "the best way for the students to get better at English speaking is...". Here, A = the best way, preposition = for, B = the students, to-infinitive = to get better at English speaking

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