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The team scored one goal to win the game.

(During their game, in the second half, the team scored one goal that allowed them to win)

Q1) What does the above sentence imply?

1. The team scored one goal in order to win the game.(purpose)

2. The team scored one goal and won the game.(result)

3. Either 1 or 2 according to context.

4. Either 1 or 2, but more like 1.

5. Either 1 or 2, but more like 2.

I think the right answer is 2 or 5 because scoring goals isn't what we can do purposely, but almost by chance or luck.

Q3) Does the below sentence still have the implication of result?, not purpose?

The team could score one goal to win the game

(I wrote this sentence to imply the future expectation that the team might win the them if they score one goal)

Please answer questions one by one, I really want to know them exactly. Thanks for your help in advance.

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fire1

The team scored one/a goal to win the game. [You can use 'a' instead of 'one' if you want.]

(During their game, in the second half, the team scored one goal that allowed them to win)

Q1) What does the above sentence imply? It implies 2 below.

1. The team scored one goal in order to win the game.(purpose)
For purpose you would need

The team had/has to score one (more) goal (in order) to win the game.

2. The team scored one goal and won the game.(result)

3. Either 1 or 2 according to context.

4. Either 1 or 2, but more like 1.

5. Either 1 or 2, but more like 2.

I think the right answer is 2 or 5 because scoring goals isn't what we can do purposely, but almost by chance or luck.

Q3) Does the below sentence still have the implication of result?, not purpose? No. 'could' means potential for success, not success. could = might be able to in this sentence.

The team could score one goal to win the game

(I wrote this sentence to imply the future expectation that the team might win the them if they score one goal) Expectation doesn't count as a result.

Please answer questions one by one, I really want to know them exactly. Thanks for your help in advance.

As explained above.

CJ

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fire1Please answer questions one by one, I really want to know them exactly. Thanks for your help in advance.

The team scored one goal to win the game.

(During their game, in the second half, the team scored one goal that allowed them to win)

Q1) What does the above sentence imply?

1. The team scored one goal in order to win the game.(purpose) Emotion: no

2. The team scored one goal and won the game.(result) Emotion: yes The final score was 1-0.

3. Either 1 or 2 according to context. Emotion: no

4. Either 1 or 2, but more like 1. Emotion: no

5. Either 1 or 2, but more like 2. Emotion: no

Where is Q2?

fire1Q3) Does the below sentence below still have the implication of result?, not purpose?

The team could score one goal to win the game.

The team has to score more goals than the opposing team in order to win. So your statement implies the following:

1) The game is in progress.
2) The score is tied at 0-0.
3) The speaker believes that the defense of the team mentioned is strong enough to prevent the other team from scoring any goals. i.e. The opposition will not score any goal in the game. They also believe that there is a possibility of the team scoring one (but not more than one) goal from this point until the game ends.




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1. The team scored one goal to win the game.

2. The team could score one goal to win the game.


I'd say the infinitivals here are result adjuncts.

1. implies that scoring one goal resulted in the team winning the game. An example of a purpose adjunct would be The team needed to score one more goal (in order) to win the game.

2. is infelicitous, though the more salient interpretation is that if the possibility of scoring one goal is fulfilled, then the team would win the game. It could be interpreted as a marginal case of condition: if the team could score one goal they would win the game.

Comments  
CalifJimThe team could score one goal to win the game (I wrote this sentence to imply the future expectation that the team might win the them if they score one goal) Expectation doesn't count as a result.

Or as for "the team could score one goal to win the game", does this sentence imply that the future expectation that the team's one goal will lead to the result of their winning the game" ?

I think in this sense, the sentence could imply the expectation about the result by their scoring one goal.

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fire1as for "the team could score one goal to win the game", does this sentence imply that the future expectation that the team's one goal will lead to the result of their winning the game" ?

I don't know what you're asking. The sentence is faulty. Here's what you wrote:

... does this sentence imply that

[the ... expectation [that the ... goal will lead to the result ... game] ??? ]

What about the expectation? There's no verb that goes with 'expectation'.


In any case, the sentence says

The team might be able to score a goal in order to win the game, i.e., if their purpose is to win the game, they might be able to achieve their purpose by scoring a goal.

OR

The team might be able to score a goal and (by doing so) win the game.


My first impulse is to take it as shown in the first paraphrase, but I suppose the second paraphrase might also work.

CJ

CalifJimThe team might be able to score a goal and (by doing so) win the game.

Is your second paragraph to do with "to infinitive result" ? And do you mean the "could score" sentence's "to win" implies both "purpose" and "result", but it is more like "purpose" in the case?

CalifJimI don't know what you're asking. The sentence is faulty. Here's what you wrote:

I'm sorry. I was going to write "...imply the expectation that the team.. "



The team could have scored one more goal to win the game if at least 5 minutes had been left.

And in the above sentence, do you read "to win" as to-infinitive result? or even in this case, can "to win" be read as both "result" and "purpose"?

I think in this case, "to win" should read only as "result", not "purpose", because the below sentence sounds strange.

The team could have scored one more goal in order to win the game if at least 5 minutes had been left.

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
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fire1CalifJim
The team might be able to score a goal and (by doing so) win the game.
Is your second paragraph to do with "to infinitive result" ? And do you mean the "could score" sentence's "to win" implies both "purpose" and "result", but it is more like "purpose" in the case?

I don't know which part you consider my "second paragraph". The underlined sentence, however, is my paraphrase of your sentence which shows the interpretation of "to win" as an infinitive of result.

fire1The team could have scored one more goal to win the game if at least 5 minutes had been left.
And in the above sentence, do you read "to win" as to-infinitive result? or even in this case, can "to win" be read as both "result" and "purpose"?

I can read it either way — result or purpose.

fire1I think in this case, "to win" should read only as "result", not "purpose", because the below sentence sounds strange.The team could have scored one more goal in order to win the game if at least 5 minutes had been left.

It doesn't sound so strange to me.

CJ

 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.