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Can anyone help me??!?!

A student wants to know why her text has "I'd like to help you move apartment" and not "I'd like to help you to move apartment" anybody anybody please help!!!!

Matt
JAPAN
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Hello Guest

(1) "I'd like to help you move (your) apartment"
(2) "I'd like to help you to move (your) apartment"

Both are correct.
#1 was originally AmE but now it became common also in BrE.

paco
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A student wants to know why her text has "I'd like to help you move apartment" and not "I'd like to help you to move apartment" anybody anybody please help!!!!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

JT: I don't think that either is natural English, Matt. It may be that the text in question is a Japanese produced text.

"I'd like to help you move." OR "I'd like to help you move to your new apartment." OR

"I'd like to help you move out of your apartment." OR possibly some others. The originals, to my mind, just don't cut it.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
Emotion: whisper Paco, "now it has become common", Jim Emotion: smile
 just the truth's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In BrE, I'd be quite surprised to hear 'move apartment'. You might hear or read:

1. I'd like to help you move house.
2. I'd like to help you move to a/your new flat.

Both 'help you to move' and 'help you move' would be heard.

The context is presumably 'menacing landlord with baseball bat'.

MrP