+0
Children are quick to learn.
My brother was slow to react.
Are the above infinitives adverbial or adjectival in nature ?
1 2
Comments  
I take them as adjectival.
The only verb to be modified is "to be."

A counter example would be: My brother is continually late for work.

I'd say "continually" here is adverbial, because it modifies "is."

My brother was always slow to learn. "Always" is adverbial. The infinitive modifies "slow."
But in the sentence "My brother was slow to react" , "to react" modifies the adjective "slow".
So, shouldn't "to react" be adverbial ?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
To my ear, they answer the question "How?" or "In what way?", not the question "What kind of?" so they would be adverbial.

Quick in what way? Quick to learn. They learn quickly.

Slow in what way? Slow to react. He reacts slowly.

CJ
Debpriya De"My brother was slow to react" , "to react" modifies the adjective "slow".
My interpretation of "to react" is an "infintive phrase" which is adverbial by nature.

Hmmm. This confuses me. I guess you can say that adverbs have two functions:
1. to modify verbs
2. to modify adjectives

My brother is slow. "Slow" is the adjective complement of the verb, "to be." Since "to react" modifies the adjective "slow," I guess it has to be an adverb.

For some reason, when someone asks if an expression is adverbial, I think only in terms of function #1. My mistake. Emotion: embarrassed

He was driving a dark blue Ford. "Dark" is an adverb. I'm not sure what question it answers.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
dimsumexpress an "infintive phrase" which is adverbial by nature.
You do not have the right to park here. ??
He was the first to reach the summit. ??
Avangimmm. This confuses me. I guess you can say that adverbs have two functions:
1. to modify verbs
2. to modify adjectives
But adverbial phrase can modify another phrase or the main clause.
i.e. John is a lot of fun [to be with]. The 'blue' is the main clause with is a complete sentential structure by itself. The 'green' is the infinitive phrase which modifies the main clause. And that's how I approach adverbials.
AvangiHe was driving a dark blue Ford. "Dark" is an adverb. I'm not sure what question it answers.
I see where you're coming from. By definitition, an adj. cannot modify another adj. such as in "dark blue". So to satisfy, or to bend the rule, some of us approach the 'first' adjctive as an 'adverb'.
To me, that's incorrect. However, we can easiy get around this problem by hyphenating the two adjectives to form a componud adjective, like ' bitter-sweet ' , and 'bright- red'.
dimsumexpress which modifies the main clause. And that's how I approach adverbials.
I agree with you that when something modifies the whole clause, it's adverbial. The verb is sort of the default king of the clause. Emotion: happy - A.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more