+0
When we use infinitives and gerunds, I think they are more or less “thoughts of the action”. However, I read that some infinitives can become clauses, and vice versa. How about gerunds? When can I turn infinitives to clauses?

“I have a book to read” -> “I have a book that I will read” (I used the modal will).

“I play soccer to stay in shape” à “I play soccer so that I can stay in shape”

However, I’m having trouble understanding this one.

“He claims that he is famous” vs. “He claims to be famous”.

I don’t how to explain this, but at first I thought infinitives are verbals that don’t show “action”. (I hope you know what I mean). With my first two examples, modals are used to indicate that the “action” isn’t happening at that time. I may be wrong; can someone explain to me the rules?

Oh and another questions.

“I hope (myself) to become a doctor” I can use the infinitive here.

“I hope for Carol to become a doctor” vs. “I hope Carol becomes a doctor”

Is there a difference in meaning? Are they both correct? One example uses an infinitive whereas the other uses a clause. =S Thanks. I have really weird questions!
+0
BlackBlitzWhen can I turn infinitives to clauses?
The answer is very disappointing, I'm afraid. You can turn infinitives into clauses whenever the grammar of the governing verb allows it.

claim allows either a that clause or an infinitive construction when the subject of the infinitive is the same as the subject of the sentence.
He claims that he is famous.

He claims to be famous.
He claims that Lucy is famous.

*He claims Lucy to be famous.
*He claims for Lucy to be famous.

hope has a very similar grammar:
He hopes that he will arrive on time.
He hopes to arrive on time.
He hopes that Lucy will arrive on time.

*He hopes Lucy to arrive on time.
*He hopes for Lucy to arrive on time.
BlackBlitzI don’t how to explain this, but at first I thought infinitives are verbals that don’t show “action”.
The infinitive standing alone is probably the most abstract way of conceiving of the meaning of a verb, but I wouldn't make too much of the idea that it doesn't show action.

CJ
Comments  
You are asking basically the same question with the above.

So I won't break down each one.

Compare: I have a job to finish, I have no time to talk! = I have a job I must get done.

“I have a book to read” => “I have a book that I must will read” They are roughly equal in meaning.

“I play soccer to stay in shape” direct infinitive statement, which is fine

Same as:

Compare: Everybody works to earn a paycheck. Direct context. Perfectly ok.

"So that"

-- reason/ casue-- resultt / effect

In this sentence “I play soccer so that I can stay in shape”

The "so that" is a conjunctive phrase which connects two independent sentences.

It contrasts one action as being the cause to another as the effect.



“I hope for Carol to become a doctor” vs. “I hope Carol becomes a doctor” This is not grammatical in my opinion without adding "will" after Carol. I would revise it to "I hope Carol will become a doctor someday". Using present tense "becomes" is illogical.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.