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I am competitive man, who not only has experience in soccer but also is passionate about it, wanting to know everything there is to know about the game.

1. Is the emboldened ing clause above used correctly? It just sounds slightly cumbersome to me, but I can't see anything grammatically wrong with it.

2. How does the ing clause function?

3. Have you a paraphrase for this sentence?

Thank you Emotion: smile
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English 1b3I am a competitive man, who not only has experience in soccer but also is passionate about it, wanting to know everything there is to know about the game.
1. There is nothing wrong with the sentence (now that I have added a):
2. In this part of the world we call it a main clause equivalent because our grammar has it that if there is no finite verb, there is no clause either.
3. ... and I want to know everything there is to know about the game.

CB
Comments  
Cool Breezeand I want to know everything there is to know about the game.

Instead of I am this,..., and I want

Isn't it more like that it is:

I am a competitive man, who not only has experience in soccer but also is passionate about it, and who wants to know everything there is to know about the game.

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Also, I read the following about participial clauses, which made me think the original sentence in this thread was wrong. Is this quote a slightly incorrect?

Another common error is that students tend to overlook the fact that the two actions have to be in a cause-and-effect relationship or a before-and-after sequential relationship.

û: Having considerate and loving parents, Mary loves sports and outdoor activities.
Some students tend to think that the function of participle clauses is to incorporate more than one action in a sentence. They fail to realize that the two actions have to have some relationship