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Hello there,

I want to ask one question here .

1)Removing his glasses, the professor shook his head with disappointment.

2) The professor shook his head with disappointment, removing his glasses.


What is the difference between the two sentences?

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ritikWhat is the difference between the two sentences?

The second one is much less effective because the participle clause is too far away from 'the professor', the implicit subject of that clause.

Besides, that gesture is normally performed with the removal of the glasses first and then the shaking of the head, so you might as well write them in that order to make it easier for the reader to picture what's happening.

CJ

Comments  
ritikWhat is the difference between the two sentences?

Not much, because neither one works. Such a phrase has to be intimately connected with the main clause, or else it belongs in a different sentence.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

I want to ask one question here .

1)Removing his glasses, the professor shook his head with disappointment.

Does the first sentence mean,

The professor first removed his glasses and then shook his head with disappointment.

2) The professor shook his head with disappointment, removing his glasses.

Does the second sentence mean,

The professor shook his head with disappointment while he was removing his glasses.


What difference between the two sentences I have written is correct ?

ritikWhat difference between the two sentences I have written is correct ?

Neither sentence works because his removing his glasses does not lead to or follow from his head-shaking. Consider "Removing his glasses, he squinted into the microscope." or "Taking careful aim, Annie shot the cigarette from the volunteer's lips." or "She read the final sentence and gently closed the book, breathing a sigh of contentment." Your statement is two statements - "The professor removed his glasses and shook his head in (not "with") disappointment."

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