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The sufferings of Our Lord , which culminated in His death upon the cross , seem to have been conceived of as one inseparable whole from a very early period. Even in the Acts of the Apostles (i, 3) St. Luke speaks of those to whom "shewed himself alive after his passion " (meta to mathein autou). In the Vulgate this has been rendered post passionem suam, and not only the Reims Testament but the Anglican Authorized and Revised Versions, as well as the medieval English translation attributed to Wyclif , have retained the word "passion" in English. Passio also meets us in the same sense in other early writings (e.g. Tertullian , "Adv. Marcion.", IV, 40) and the word was clearly in common use in the middle of the third century, as in Cyprian , Novatian , and Commodian . The last named writes:
"Hoc Deus hortatur, hoc lex, hoc passio Christi
Ut resurrecturos nos credamus in novo sæclo."
St. Paul declared, and we require no further evidence to convince us that he spoke truly, that Christ crucified was "unto the Jews indeed a stumbling-block, and unto the Gentiles foolishness" (1 Corinthians 1:23 ). The shock to Pagan feeling, caused by the ignominy of Christ's Passion and the seeming incompatibility of the Divine nature with a felon's death, seems not to have been without its effect upon the thought of Christians themselves.

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My question is on the first sentence of the above.

.....as one inseparable whole from a very early period.

Is it grammatical to say 'one inseparable whole' ?

It would be correct to say 'His death on the cross seem to have been conceived as ....

I can't fathom out to say that 'it conceived as one inseparable whole'.
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Hi,

The sufferings of Our Lord, which culminated in His death upon the cross, seem to have been conceived of as one inseparable whole from a very early period. Even in the Acts of the Apostles (i, 3) St. Luke speaks of those to whom Christ "shewed himself alive after his passion" (meta to mathein autou). In the Vulgate this has been rendered post passionem suam, and not only the Reims Testament but the Anglican Authorized and Revised Versions, as well as the medieval English translation attributed to Wyclif, have retained the word "passion" in English. Passio also meets us in the same sense in other early writings (e.g. Tertullian, "Adv. Marcion.", IV, 40) and the word was clearly in common use in the middle of the third century, as in Cyprian, Novatian, and Commodian. The last named writes:
"Hoc Deus hortatur, hoc lex, hoc passio Christi
Ut resurrecturos nos credamus in novo sæclo."
St. Paul declared, and we require no further evidence to convince us that he spoke truly, that Christ crucified was "unto the Jews indeed a stumbling-block, and unto the Gentiles foolishness" (1 Corinthians 1:23). The shock to Pagan feeling, caused by the ignominy of Christ's Passion and the seeming incompatibility of the Divine nature with a felon's death, seems not to have been without its effect upon the thought of Christians themselves.

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My question is on the first sentence of the above.

.....as one inseparable whole from a very early period.

Is it grammatical to say 'one inseparable whole' ? I don't like this wording. I'd prefer to say 'one indivisible whole'. I know how to divide a whole apple, but I don't think it makes good sense to speak of separating an apple.

It would be correct to say 'His death on the cross seem to have been conceived as .... No. Death is singular, so the verb needs to be 'seems' in the sentence you have written here.

I can't fathom out to say that 'it conceived as one inseparable whole'.
I don't think you understand the sentence correctly. The subject is not 'it', not 'His death'. The subject is 'the sufferings'.

If I haven't answered all the questions you are trying to ask, please ask them again in another way.

Best wishes, Clive
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<...apple...>

And yet, an omelette is "an inseparable whole", I suppose; if it's a good omelette...

MrP
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Comments  
Hi,

There was once a man whose friend bet him that he couldn't take a sip from a spittoon. The man drank the whole thing at one go. When his friend asked why, the man said that once he started, he couldn't stop.

Best wishes, Clive

Note how this thread started on a high tone, and is now going downhill rapidly
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