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What is the difference between instable and unstable?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
English is an ever evolving language, and the differences in our language have helped it become the worlds most powerful language
AnonymousNewsflash, the rest of the world doesn't speak American english. Instable comes from the queens english which you americans need to adopt back into your hacked vocabulary
As for the adjective, both instable and unstable are used without any difference in meaning.
As for the noun, just instability is used and unstability is not an English word.
Cheers
Hamid
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
JandrosUSA Hmmm. The World Engish Dictionary says it's 'less common' ... hell yes it's less common. In all my years (50+) I have NEVER seen or heard the word 'instable'. My advice is to forget that, at least in regard to American English. Just use unstable or instability.
That goes for me, too, and I'm a British English speaker aged 70+.

Rover
AnonymousNewsflash, the rest of the world doesn't speak American english. Instable comes from the queens english which you americans need to adopt back into your hacked vocabulary
I apologise for the ignorance of someone I assume to be a countryman of mine, and roundly denounce his arrogance.

Rude remarks like this, written in execrable English, do nothing to improve mutual understanding or contribute in any meaningful way to this educational forum.

Rover
Brits say untsable too. Anonymous is mentally UNstable.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Newsflash, no one cares about the "queens english" because it's pompous and at times sounds quite comical.
I am an American...however, my ancestry is European (Scottish, Irish, English, French and German) so to say "no one cares about the 'Queen's English' is totally rude and arrogant. I am proud of my heritage and appreciate the hierarchy of the 'Queen's English' because that is how we Americans got our language. Don't knock it! We all learn from each other.
'Instable' is living on a feeding-tube at this stage, British or American. Forget about dictionaries.

There is a single instance in the British National Corpus of English, as opposed to over 650 instances of 'unstable', and that one instance may be a misspelling in the source material, for all we know. There are no instances in MICASE, Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English, which we may regard as a source of educated spoken American English.

'Instable' in a Google search turns up 10:1 in favour of 'unstable' rather, and a large proportion are from non-English texts. Another subset is from medicine where it legitimately remains and has a special meaning; and still more are probably simply misspellings of 'unstable', or come from dialect islands that still hang on to an archaic form.

--dan. West Coast Canadian English
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Newsflash:

There is no such language as "American English" as English is spoken as the De-facto language. America does not have an official language… therefore Americans speak English.
There are 79 countries that have English as there official language
6 countries where the language is a de facto language these countries include United Kingdom, America, Canada, Australia.
Read here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_where_English_is_an_official_language
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