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a) To get upstairs, you can use the back entrance, instead of which the side entrance.

b) To get upstairs, you can use the back entrance, instead of which you can use the side entrance.

c) You can use the back entrance if you like; instead of which the side entrance.

d) You can use the back entrance if you like; instead of which you can use the side entrance.

Would you use the semicolon or the period?

Thanks
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Whoa! None of these sentences makes any sense. 'Instead of which' is a negating phrase, in the first place, and it needs a clause following (so no A or C in any case).
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Thank you.

Could you please give me an example where 'instead of which' is used correctly?
I requested a salary increment from my employer, instead of which he gave me a pair of free tickets to the World Cup final.