+0
Besides World No Tobacco Day, there are several similar holidays, such as No Smoking Day in the UK and the Great American Smokeout, that/which are intended to help smokers quit.

Hi,

Which fits better in the above, that or which? Thanks.
Comments  
which: after comma
Thanks, Marius.

I agree with you, but the original from an English magzine uses "that." So I wonder if it's also possible to use "that."
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
It is possible if the comma is removed. If a comma is used, 'which' is the correct word.
It is possible to use that after comma, and there's a big fight going on that/which.
Bryan Garner, in Modern American Usage (you should buy it, if you can), recommends:
- restrictive clauses: use that without comma

- non-restrictive clauses: use which with comma
I almost got confused! Emotion: surprise Because I was told that "that" is not used to introduce a parenthetical clause in modern English, so it's not used with non-restrictive relative clauses. You have to use "which" in those cases.
But your sentence is actually different, and the last past can actually be seen as a restrictive relative clause. So I think both are acceptable in your sentence.

There are several similar holidays that/which are intended to help smokers quit.
There are several similar holidays (blah blah, whatever) that/which are intended to help smokers quit.

That's my opinion. "That" doesn't sound bad to me in your sentence. Emotion: smile
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
AngliholicBesides World No Tobacco Day, there are several similar holidays, such as No Smoking Day in the UK and the Great American Smokeout, that/which are intended to help smokers quit.
Hi all
Both pronouns are possible, as Kooyeen says. The comma has nothing to do with the relative pronoun but is used because such as No Smoking Day in the UK and the Great American Smokeout is set off with commas. No grammatical rule prevents the use of a comma before that if something else requires it. The same applies to that when it is a conjunction:
I knew that he had read the book.
But: I knew that he had bought the book, that he had read it and that he had thrown it away after that.
CB
Cool BreezeThe comma has nothing to do with the relative pronoun but is used because such as No Smoking Day in the UK and the Great American Smokeout is set off with commas.
Yeah, I would say so. Emotion: smile