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On 16 Jan 2004 12:16:17 -0800, Evan Kirshenbaum
It doesn't. It was a joke that made the apparently erroneous assumption that you have a passing familiarity with 20th-century ... between "Johnson" and "Pledge", a common household product product manufactured by S.C. Johnson. Personally, I'm betting that CJ got it.

Is knowing about corporation names an important part of American culture?
Geo
Durkin:

Still, Joey, you might ask us your own questions, get our answers, get to understand them, and save your research for your own private study.

I don't get it. Isn't that what I'm doing?

No, Joey.
You didn't include any part of your previous message, but it was snippets from questions asked and answered in the early days of this newsgroup.

Archives are there for those who care to read them, and you and other researchers can conduct further inquiries by private email.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It doesn't. It was a joke that made the apparently ... by S.C. Johnson. Personally, I'm betting that CJ got it.

Is knowing about corporation names an important part of American culture?

Naah it's only about keeping one's eyes and ears open, having some basic intelligence, and being aware of the general goings-on in one's surroundings.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
It doesn't. It was a joke that made the apparently ... by S.C. Johnson. Personally, I'm betting that CJ got it.

Is knowing about corporation names an important part of American culture?

Sad, but true. References to historical figures, and biblical and classical allusions do nothing but confuse many of our youth, while the TV generation has little trouble recognizing metaphorical references to (the more recent) TV commercials and jingles.
It doesn't. It was a joke that made the apparently ... by S.C. Johnson. Personally, I'm betting that CJ got it.

Is knowing about corporation names an important part of American culture?

Not important, per se, but you sort of expect people to be familiar with brand names of things they have around the house and see advertised. I might not expect people to know that Pledge was made by S.C. Johnson (and, indeed, I wasn't sure myself that it was), but I'd expect them to be familiar enough with both names to make the connection.
There are some corporate names that aren't widely advertised. I wouldn't, for example, expect most people to know Kimberly-Clark, even though they know their most popular brand, Kleenex. But this was more like somebody replying to a mention of a "gamble" by saying that it was more like a "Procter".

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Code should be designed to make it
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >easy to get it right, not to workPalo Alto, CA 94304 >if you get it right.

(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Is knowing about corporation names an important part of American culture?

Sad, but true. References to historical figures, and biblical and classical allusions do nothing but confuse many of our youth, while the TV generation has little trouble recognizing metaphorical references to (the more recent) TV commercials and jingles.

This is, of course, completely different from all other times and places, in which the bulk of the people were more familiar with historical figures and biblical and classical allusions than they were with well-known popular figures of the day and the items found in their houses and towns.
I'll grant that it's only in the last 150 years or so that brand names became a pervasive part of the everyday world, but I suspect that you will find a similar familiarity (and expectation of familiarity) with brand names in pretty much every culture that has them.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >The mystery of government is not how
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >Washington works, but how to make itPalo Alto, CA 94304 >stop.

(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Barnes:

to Huh?

There is no such thing as a question "too foolish" to deserve an answer.

Possibly not, but we admire you for trying.
Lieblich's Law: No query addressed to AUE is so foolish, inane, or ignorant that it cannot elicit at least one serious answer.

Speaking of famous Doctors, every time I go to the beach I wonder who Dr. Zogg was.

And every time I put on my pajamas I wonder who Dr Denton was.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
And every time I put on my pajamas I wonder who Dr Denton was.

The first guy to implant an artificial heart in a human.

http://www.texasheartinstitute.org/cooley.html
(It's bugging me that I can't track down the actual answer to your question. The trademark was sold to a company called Wormser in 1999, and their site doesn't have anything on the history before that.)

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >There are just two rules of
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >governance in a free society: MindPalo Alto, CA 94304 >your own business. Keep your hands

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
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