1  3 4 5 6 7 » 24
"=> It is not a verbal contract ... but an oral one that => is not worth the paper it is written on.
=
=
=An oral contract "is not worth the paper it's written on"? =I must be lost!
It's a "samuelgoldwynism." Also referred to as "goldwynesque speech"!"

HUH???!!!
Simon R. Hughes filted:
Thus spake Ross Howard:

The guy who invented Pledge.

That was his brother, Mr Johnson.

Now a "Johnson doctor" on the other hand, that'd be a urologist..r
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Had this been posted nowadays, it would no doubt have provoked a blizzard of "Oy!"s.
For those curious about the history of the "twisted idea" of pronouncing as /'INglIS/, see the recent sci.lang thread on "Inglish" , to which I contributed:
Here's OED's etymological note for England :
This word and its cognates, English , etc. are the only instances in which in mod. standard English the letter e stands in an accented syllable for /I/. The change of an earlier /EN/ into /IN/ is strictly normal, and in all other examples the spelling has followed the pronunciation. Cf. wing , ME. wenge ; string , OE. strenge ; link , OE. hlence .
So the change to /'INglIS/ and /'INgl@nd/ was not particularly unusual it's just that the spelling of and remained conservative for some reason, while the spelling of , , etc. reflected the new pronunciation with /IN/.
( . . . )
So the change to /'INglIS/ and /'INgl@nd/ was not particularly unusual it's just that the spelling of and remained conservative for some reason, while the spelling of , , etc. reflected the new pronunciation with /IN/.

I say ('i:NglIS), ('i:Ngl@nd), (wi:N), and (stri:N) ("eenglish", "eengland", "weeng", and "streeng"), and I believe a lot of other people do too.
But I know that some people who use (I) in those words will swear that I'm using (I) when I pronounce them, and when they pronounce them supposedly with (I), I will clearly hear them pronouncing them with (iEmotion: smile.
So the change to /'INglIS/ and /'INgl@nd/ was not particularly ... of , , etc. reflected the new pronunciation with /IN/.

I say ('i:NglIS), ('i:Ngl@nd), (wi:N), and (stri:N) ("eenglish", "eengland", "weeng", and "streeng"), and I believe a lot of other people ... I pronounce them, and when they pronounce them supposedly with (I), I will clearly hear them pronouncing them with (iEmotion: smile.

Isn't it actually more (i) (i.e. the Spanish/Italian "i" ) than (iEmotion: smile? Do you really use exactly the same vowels as in "weakling"?

Ross Howard
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Ross:
"Before Webster (and his predecessors like Benjamin Franklin), `center' and `color' were merely variant spellings. I'm not sure which Dr. Johnson preferred." Who's "Dr. Johnson"?

The guy who invented Pledge.

I don't understand.
Draney:
Now a "Johnson doctor" on the other hand, that'd be a urologist..r

That, I got! I like your yoo-mur.
Ross:

The guy who invented Pledge.

I don't understand.

I know.

Ross Howard
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Ross: I don't understand.

I know.

Oops. I missed out this bit:
http://www.scjbrands.com/docs/menu/scj home.htm

Ross Howard
Show more