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In the subjunctive discussion from 5/13/91, someone said the following:

"As I
mentioned in another posting, the subjunctive in Latin absorbed other, older moods like the optative and jussive, so if we are going to talk about the subjunctive in English because Latin has a subjunctive, shouldn't we be more specific and discuss the optative, jussive, etc.?

What about the instrumental and ablative cases, while we're at it, or the middle voice?"
I agree with him that our subjunctive *if* it were indistiguishable from the indicative, which I don't believe it is, even 13 years later would not be worth caring about. Still, what he says about those other tenses and whatnot sounds interesting. What are the opative, jussive, ablative, etc? How come youse 2004 peeps don't mention such cool stuff anymore?

Sorry if this is a one-liner or whatever Liebs accuses me of doing that's Bun-ish. I'd like to learn some ***, and, hopefully, stimulate discussion in the process.
Bob:
Lieblich's Law: No query addressed to AUE is so foolish, inane, or ignorant that it cannot elicit at least one serious answer.

I am grateful to Martin for his help. And, no, no question is too foolish to not deserve an answer.
Corollary: There's no way to force the ignoramus to look it up.

You'd be proud of me. I've encountered many a vocab word or an English concept during my AUE chronology that I've researched myself without so much as a comment about it typed to the AUE. However, certain obscure things like "Dr. Johnson" or ancient Latin subjunctive tenses cannot be accurately Googled. I'm sure you realize this yourself, Bob. You try Googling "Johnson" and tell me what you find. Given the fact that several AUEers were able to make puns out of the name, involvng everything from window cleaner to dicks, it'd be pretty reasonable that you'd assume Johnson is a common name, even if you didn't know that beforehand.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Bob. You try Googling "Johnson" and tell me
what you find.

You try Googling either "Doctor Johnson" or "Dr. Johnson" and tell me what you find.
Gawd.
In the subjunctive discussion from 5/13/91, someone said the following: "As I mentioned in another posting, the subjunctive in Latin ... whatever Liebs accuses me of doing that's Bun-ish. I'd like to learn some ***, and, hopefully, stimulatediscussion in the process.

Call it entropy.
We are none of us as young as we once were, but some of us are in the expanding phase,
and some of us
are
not.
Still, Joey, you might ask us your own questions, get our answers, get to understand them, and save your research for your own private study.
Ross:

Oops. I missed out this bit: http://www.scjbrands.com/docs/menu/scj home.htm

OK, thanks. I get it now. I think I know that company as "Johnson &Johnson".

Think again & again.
Or look that company up.
Or read the site posted by Ross.
Of course, by this time, you have read the identification of the Dr. Johnson.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I say ('i:NglIS), ('i:[email protected]), (wi:N), and (stri:N) ("eenglish", "eengland", "weeng", and "streeng"), and I believe a lot of other people ... I pronounce them, and when they pronounce them supposedly with (I), I will clearly hear them pronouncing them with (iEmotion: smile.

I know that I can't tell the difference (by ear, anyway) between (IN) and (iN). This is all because, as far as I know, no dialect of English differentiates between /i/ and /I/ before /N/. You clearly interpret your front high vowel before /N/ as /i/; I, out of habit, interpret mine as /I/, but I sure couldn't tell you whether it's actually (I) or (i).

(Not just out of habit, actually: /I/ also fits the pattern better, as my dialect allows /A./, /E/, and /V/ - canonical short vowels - before /N/, but not canonical long vowels like /u/, /o/, or the diphthongs. This makes it more reasonable, I think, to assign the ambiguous cases to the short-vowel phonemes /I/ and /&/, rather than the long-vowel phonemes /i/ and /e/ that they also resemble.)
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Ross:

Oops. I missed out this bit: http://www.scjbrands.com/docs/menu/scj home.htm

OK, thanks. I get it now. I think I know that company as "Johnson & Johnson".

I doubt it. Johnson & Johnson was founded in 1886 in New Brunswick, NJ, by Robert Wood Johnson and Edward Mead Johnson (and James Wood) to make surgical dressings. S.C. Johnson was also founded in 1886, but by Samuel Curtis Johnson, in Racine, WI, to make parquet floors. I don't believe that any of these Johnsons were doctors.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Your claim might have more
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >credibility if you hadn't mispelledPalo Alto, CA 94304 >"inteligent"
(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
"=> It is not a verbal contract ... but an oral one that => is not worth the paper it ... worth the paper it's written on"? =I must be lost! It's a "samuelgoldwynism." Also referred to as "goldwynesque speech"!" HUH???!!!

So give us your best guess as to the name of the person that might refer to, and let us know what happens when you hand that name to Google.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >The skinny models whose main job is
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >to display clothes aren't hired forPalo Alto, CA 94304 >their sex appeal. They're hired

(650)857-7572 > Peter Moylan

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I say ('i:NglIS), ('i:[email protected]), (wi:N), and (stri:N) ("eenglish", "eengland", "weeng", ... (I), I will clearly hear them pronouncing them with (iEmotion: smile.

I know that I can't tell the difference (by ear, anyway) between (IN) and (iN). This is all because, as ... and /V/ - canonical short vowels - before /N/, but not canonical long vowels like /u/, /o/, or the diphthongs.

Wot, no "oink", "boink", "boing", or "Oingo Boingo"?

That diphthong has a high front offglide, so it doesn't undermine your case.
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