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When I try to pronounce (IN), (&N), or {EN), it seems difficult and unnatural. But (A:N) (as in "wrong") and ... of "The rain in Spain falls mainly at an angle on the ankles of the angels on the plain" at

http://www.exw6sxq.com/sparky/aue related/speech examples/rain in spain.wav
. Also "We sing if we bring in a win" and "In England we sing things in English" at

http://www.exw6sxq.com/sparky/aue related/speech examples/win and wing.html
. `

To me, your "ankle" and "angle" sound higher than the vowels I would use in those words, but I don't think they're high enough to be (e), nor do I hear an (I) glide.
Your vowel in "wing" etc. is probably slightly more towards (i) than mine, but the most striking thing to me in that recording was that your "win" vowel sounded diphthongal - something like ([email protected]).
Jonathan
"Before Webster (and his predecessors like Benjamin Franklin), `center' and `color' were merely variant spellings. I'm not sure which Dr. Johnson preferred." Who's "Dr. Johnson"?

Samuel Johnson, I presume.
His dictionary (1755) has "centre" & "colour".

Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Evan:
=An oral contract "is not worth the paper it's written on"? =I must be lost! It's a "samuelgoldwynism." Also referred to as "goldwynesque speech"!" HUH???!!!

So give us your best guess as to the name of the person that might refer to,

"Samuel Goldwyn"? Is he Google-able? Is that even the right name?
SNL:
For those AUErs who also read AFU: don't you want to introduce Joey to Jami JoAnne and see what happens?

Who is she? Wpuld I like her? Is AFU "alt.french.usage"? I don't speak French.
Hughes:
A little help please; isn't the guy who invented Pledge "Mr. CLEAN"?

Robert Nixon invented Pledge?

The president of America? I'm *so* lost.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Dean:
Richard, shirley.

Do you know Google can't find a single well-known Richard Shirley to enable me to make some stunning jokes?

More phoney intellectualism, I see? Why do you people go out of your ways* to appear to know useless triviar? It makes more work for us *all*! *Some of us ain't gots the time!
Laura:
Sometimes Google can let you down. I've wasted a lot of time today playing with the new Google feature which is being tested which lets you read extracts of books.

"Amazon.com", maybe? It's great. I don't even buy text books anymore. I just Amazon them!
I see Joey has attained Bun Mui status a feeder of straight lines.

For those AUErs who also read AFU: don't you want to introduce Joey to Jami JoAnne and see what happens?

For a month or two, I've occasionally lurked on AFU; and I feel right at home. It's amazing how many AUEers post to that group.

Mike Bandy
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I know that I can't tell the difference (by ear, anyway) between (IN) and (iN). This is all because, as far as I know, no dialect of English differentiates between /i/ and /I/ before /N/.

You gotta be kidding. "Tin" and "teen" are pronounced quite differently from each other, and the difference is exactly that between "bit" and "beat". (Smaller then the difference between "tin" and "ten", I think, but just barely.) If I heard someone say "teen" when they meant "tin", I would find it jarringly conspicuous. Mike Hardy
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